Marvel comics

See What's New in Marvel AR 7/30/14 (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
New in Marvel AR 7/30/14 Have you taken the next step in your comics reading experience by experiencing Augmented Reality via the Marvel AR App for iOS and Android devices? If not, you’re missing out! Here’s Marvel Content Producer & Manager of the AR App Judy Stephens to give you the overview: “The Marvel AR App brings new, exciting and free content to your print comics by using an iOS or Android device. To access any of the content, all you need is your phone/tablet, the app and an internet connection. Hold your device over the panel with the AR icon and watch the future unfold! With Marvel NOW!, we're kicking off a schedule of even more Marvel goodness for your eyes and ears! Each week stay tuned for bonus content including videos from the creators, original sketches & pencils, art evolutions, surprise celebrity appearances and more!  Got an idea for a Marvel AR video or bonus content? Let us know on twitter @Marvel!” Have you got your Marvel AR App downloaded and your iOS and Android ready to go? Then check out the exciting AR content available this week! AVENGERS #33 Original Sin continues to propel Earth’s Mightiest Heroes into the future with Jonathan Hickman and Leinil Francis Yu providing the fuel! Yu talks about designing the look of an era 50,000 years forward in time. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #17 Brian Michael Bendis, Nick Bradshaw and Michael Avon Oeming guide Star-Lord and Captain Marvel to reunite the fragmented team! To see Marvel AR video executions from this week and more, visit our YouTube playlist and keep checking back for new additions! Each Marvel NOW! comic with Marvel AR also features a special look at what’s led up to the issue and what to expect within that you can access just by aiming your device at the cover. Enjoy this week’s AR, and we’ll see you next week for another round!
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Marvel Congratulates Joe Quesada on Receiving a 2014 Inkpot Award (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
Marvel Congratulates Joe Quesada Each year, Comic-Con International in San Diego awards a select few recipients with the prestigious Inkpot Award. Recognizing the best and brightest individuals for their contributions to the world of comics, science fiction/fantasy, film, television, animation and more, the Inkpot Award has been awarded to a number of industry icons since its creation. Marvel is pleased to congratulate Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada, who took home an Inkpot Award in a surprise presentation during his annual Cup O’ Joe panel at this year’s convention. A long-time writer, artist and editor, Quesada was promoted to Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics in 2000. In his time as Editor-in-Chief, he oversaw some of the biggest events in Marvel history and presided over a creative renaissance for the company. Promoted to Chief Creative Officer in 2010, Joe now lends his considerable talents to more than just publishing as he oversees the creative aspects of Marvel in other media – from movies, to television, to video games and everything in between! Marvel would also like to congratulate all the other recipients of this year’s Inkpot Award.
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Get the Marvel Comics App Update for 7/30/14 (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
Marvel Comics App Update 7/30/14 Want more comics in the Marvel Comics App for iOS and Android? Your search is over! Check out these comics that just hit the Marvel Comics App and keep coming back every week for new additions to the growing library! That's right, we add new books every week to feed your need for super-heroic entertainment! Don't have the Marvel Comics App? What are you waiting for?! Download it for iOS and Android! Here's your official list of comic books hitting the Marvel Comics app today! Digital Comics On-Sale This Week   100TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL: GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #1 ALL-NEW GHOST RIDER #5 AVENGERS #33 AVENGERS WORLD #10 CYCLOPS #3 GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #17 HAWKEYE #19 IRON MAN SPECIAL #1 IRON PATRIOT #5 GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY INFINITE #1 NEW AVENGERS #21 ORIGINAL SIN: HULK VS IRON MAN #3 SECRET AVENGERS #6 ULTIMATE FF #5 UNCANNY AVENGERS #22 UNCANNY X-MEN #24 X-MEN #17          Also On Sale AVENGERS (1963) #53 DAREDEVIL: CAGE MATCH (2010) #1 HERO FOR HIRE (1972) #1 HOWARD THE DUCK (1976) #1-17 HOWARD THE DUCK (2007) #1-4 HUMAN TORCH (2003) #1-12 IRON MAN (1968) #115, 117, 134, 136-138, 140-148, 179, 180, 196-199 KA-ZAR (1970) #2-3 MARVEL TALES (1966) #30 ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL (2005) #3 UNCANNY X-MEN ANNUAL (1970) #3 UNCANNY X-MEN ANNUAL (2006) #1 WOLVERINE (1988) #54 X-FORCE ANNUAL (1992) #1         Collections On-Sale This Week ALL-NEW INVADERS VOL. 1: GODS AND SOLDIERS AMAZING SPIDER-MAN EPIC COLLECTION: COSMIC ADVENTURES EXILES VOL. 2: A WORLD APART MIGHTY AVENGERS VOL. 2: FAMILY BONDING NEW AVENGERS: LUKE CAGE - TOWN WITHOUT PITY NEW WARRIORS CLASSIC VOL. 1 THE SUPERIOR FOES OF SPIDER-MAN VOL. 2: THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN VOL. 22: ULTIMATUM UNCANNY X-MEN MASTERWORKS VOL. 4              The Marvel Comics App is available for iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch and all Android devices, and is available for free on iTunes and Google Play.
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Marvel 75: The Deadly Genesis of the All-New X-Men Pt. 3 (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
The Deadly Genesis Read parts one and two of this series Storm, Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Colossus—all names instantly associated with the X-Men whether you’re a lifelong mutant devotee or a newcomer familiar with the team’s multimedia presence over the past few decades. But those four characters have not always been at the forefront of Marvel’s mutant movement. A little over 40 years ago, those characters didn't even exist, and the X-Men as a franchise had been placed on life support, maintained in name only as a reprint title for the team’s 60’s adventures. The Marvel Universe had left the X-Men behind, relegating them to cameos in their actual hit titles. That all changed with 1975’s GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1. Writer Len Wein and artist Dave Cockrum had reimagined the team as a ragtag group of international do-gooders with personalities as colorful as their costumes. This new team found themselves bound together by their genetic gifts, desire to help the world—and little else! But by adding in personality conflicts, Wein made this group of heroes more human than any of their Marvel peers. In the final installment of our three-part interview series with Wein, you’ll learn why Cyclops stuck around as part of the new team and just how hard it was for the writer to say goodbye to the characters he helped bring to life! Marvel.com: Of all the original X-Men, you kept Cyclops around as a main character. Was that because he was the leader of the original team and you wanted to have him conflict with this new team? Len Wein: Exactly. The problem [is] he’s more interesting in terms of personality and his powers—it’s a cool power there, it’s never been argued—but he’s kind of a stick-up-his-butt guy and I always liked the idea of giving the rest of the team somebody right up front who A) has all the experience they don’t because he's been there since day one and B) is kind of a “My rules, I do this because the Professor tells me to,” pain in the ass. I wanted them all working with a guy who knew what he was doing and is, by nature, a born leader—but would not make their lives easy. Marvel.com: That also carries through for the rest of the new team itself. Storm is kind of befuddled by Colossus, and Nightcrawler and Sunfire don't get along. As a writer, was that more interesting for you to write a team where they don’t necessarily get along? Len Wein: Yes, absolutely. The reader gets to follow the journey that way. I am also a big believer in a team dynamic. One of the things that always drove me crazy—and this is off the topic to a degree and off the company to a bigger degree—but I can not count the hundreds of people over the years who have come to me and tell me that my run on the Justice League of America, when I was doing that book, was their favorite of anybody's run. And it was partly because when I took over that book, I said, “Okay, here's a dozen heroes. They would die for one another without a blink. They can’t all like each other all the time, which it’s always been that way before that. Green Arrow’s this close to being a revolutionary, Hawkman’s a cop! They’re not gonna get along! They will die for each other because they are teammates and they know they have each other's backs, but when they are sitting around over coffee, they hate each other!” Marvel.com: I think that really comes through in GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1. There are little things like when Banshee and Wolverine are teamed up, you get one panel of Banshee carrying Wolverine and Wolverine just goes, “Cripes, do you have to screech?” Len Wein: Exactly. Marvel.com: It really makes you feel like you know them after just one issue. It’s really great. Len Wein: Thank you very much, I appreciate it. Marvel.com: The first villain that the team fights is Krakoa, the Island That Walks Like a Man. What led to that character’s creation? Len Wein: I swear to God, I don’t remember. I remember the name Krakoa comes from Krakatoa, the legendary island that blew up in the 1800’s. Literally blow up. It’s gone. It created this sound heard around the world, actually. Biggest volcanic explosion in history—well, in our history. They were probably commonplace millions of years ago. So the name comes from that. The idea—I don’t remember where Dave and I came up with it. Chris [Claremont] is occasionally credited as co-plotter of the book with us and implored the fact that all he did was contribute the idea, when we were having a hard time figuring out, “How do you kill an island?” suggesting we kind of squirt it off the surface of the Earth. Marvel.com: Krakoa had a great twist wherein you reveal that the island itself is the mutant they're searching for. That's a very high concept and cool idea. Len Wein: Thank you. We’re just brilliant, what can I say? Marvel.com: During the battle on Krakoa, we get our first whiff of sulfur and brimstone when Nightcrawler teleports. That's a really interesting touch that’s also stuck around. Len Wein: That was a tribute to his demonic look. But I mean, teleporting—he’s not even the first teleporter! I think that goes back to the Vanisher in the second issue of the original run. [Nightcrawler] made teleporting cool. Marvel.com: I would definitely agree. You only got to write the original X-Men for a couple of pages in the issue. At the time, did any part of you wish that you could have gotten more of a crack at Angel, Iceman, and Jean Grey? Or were you happy just sticking with the newbies? Len Wein: Weirdly enough, a year or two before the X-Men [re-launch], there were plans to do an Iceman solo series in AMAZING ADVENTURES or one of those multi-type character books. And we actually—[artist] Ross Andru, God rest him, and I—wrote and drew a first issue and then they decided not to do the book. So it’s sitting in the drawer somewhere in the Marvel archives. Marvel.com: Oh man, I would love to read that! Len Wein: I would too because I have no clue what I wrote 45 years later! Marvel.com: I imagine you were very passionate about these new characters as you helped create most all of them. Len Wein: Oh, absolutely. I gave up the book with a great deal of reluctance. And frankly, had Chris not been so enthusiastic about taking it over and giving me a sense of confidence that at least the book was going to go to someone who cared about it as much as I did, I wouldn’t have given it up. I was Editor-in-Chief at the time and I could really only write one book a month without losing what little was left of my sanity during that period. And I was a huge Hulk fan and my longest run was on that book and I wanted to keep that going for as long as I could, so when Chris sat outside my office and I’m pondering out loud, “Which book do I give up?” Chris is going, “I'll take the X-Men! Me! Me! Over here! I'm the guy waving! Me! I’ll take it!” And that’s how he ended up with the book. Marvel.com: So that's how Chris Claremont got to be credited on both UNCANNY X-MEN #94 and #95. Len Wein: He dialogued those issues. The plot is mine and Dave’s, but he dialogued those issues. Marvel.com: GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1 took a forgotten property and successfully re-launched it, and the series hasn't stopped being successful since. What do you think made this issue so special? Len Wein: I’d like to believe it was the characters. I have a feeling, with the exception of Roy Thomas and Neal Adams’ run and Steranko’s brief run, I don't think anybody working on the book—and this is just my own position, I could be a thousand percent wrong, I don’t want to denigrate anybody else's effort—but I think that for most of the people who worked on that book after Stan and Jack and before Neal and Roy, it was a job. I don’t think they had any particular passion for the characters. And God knows Dave and I, God rest him, had a lot of passion for those characters. Be sure to check out the adventures of the all-new, all-different X-Men in UNCANNY X-MEN on Marvel Unlimited!
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Watch Out Spidey! Here Comes 90's By the Numbers With Nova (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
90s By The Numbers: Amazing Spider-Man #352 It's time to face facts, true believers – the '90s were awesome. The pouches were plentiful, the costumes were impractical, and Marvel Universe dentists made a fortune correcting damages caused by perpetually gritted teeth. Thanks to the power of nostalgia, though, what would once be considered extremely embarrassing can now be called extremely awesome! With that in mind, we've pulled a Marvel comic from the not-so-modern era and broken it down, one most excellent fact at a time! This week we're singling out AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #352 by David Michelinie and Mark Bagley. Here's "Death Walk!" by the numbers! 22 spooked cars on the West Side Highway   8 instances of Spidey-sense   6 arms and 3 faces on 1 Tri-Sentinel   3 sneaky tentacles   2 fistfuls of a ship's hull   1 incredibly high pocket   1 ruined picnic Learn the final fate of Rich Rider in GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #18!
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Marvel 75: The Legendary Steve Englehart (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
The Legendary Steve Englehart By Kiel Phegley The swaggering, surly space criminal known as Star-Lord may seem an unlikely choice for cosmic super hero—and his rise to the silver screen in Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy” starts with an equally unlikely origin. The man known as Peter Quill started his life with the man called Steve Englehart, one of the most acclaimed writers of Marvel Comics in the 1970’s. Englehart had a number of iconic runs with characters like Beast in AMAZING ADVENTURES, DEFENDERS and a pioneering stint on AVENGERS where he created early cosmic hero—and occasional Guardian—Mantis. Then in 1976, Englehart wrote the origin story for Star-Lord in MARVEL PREVIEW #4. While his plans for the character were cut short, the DNA of the hero seen in the new film all grow from Englehart's original tale. To celebrate the birth of Star-Lord and the legacy of one of Marvel’s most original voices, Marvel.com spoke to Englehart about the company in the 70’s, the zeitgeist that led he and creators like Jim Starlin to start the cosmic boom, why Mantis became the signature character of his AVENGERS tenure and how Star-Lord went from cosmic jerk to matinee idol. Marvel.com: Steve, tell us about the period of Marvel Comics that gave birth to cosmic super heroes. In the mid-1970’s, there were a lot of new characters inspired by kung-fu films or other popular cinema, but when you and other creators started playing with space-faring heroes we were still several years ahead of “Star Wars” coming out and changing the culture towards those kinds of stories. What made you and your friends look to space for adventure? Steve Englehart: Well, it was the 70’s for one thing, with everything that that entails. But in those days in order to work in comics, you had to physically come to New York. The deal was that you had to get there somehow and find a friend’s couch to sleep on, but if you could get the work then you were in the business. And pretty much everybody in the business was around. The old legends and the new guys were all hanging around the same places and going to the same parties. There was a real comic book community in New York City. And a lot of us young guys in the 70’s came in at the same time when you could still meet Wally Wood and Bill Everett and Will Eisner in the flesh, but you could also meet Frank Brunner and Al Weiss and Jim Starlin. We were young, creative people in New York City which was a very unusual place for a lot of us to be. There was also the fact that Marvel was humming on all cylinders. Those of us who were young and just out of college—or just out of the Army in my case—came to New York and started doing Marvel Comics when it was just cool as hell to be working at Marvel Comics. Everything conspired to make us as creative as possible. And the final thing that really contributed was that [then Editor-in-Chief] Roy Thomas—and I have no idea why—decided to let us all have complete creative freedom. Roy tells the story that when he was brought in with Denny O’Neil, Stan Lee had drilled them to write exactly like Stan because he was the only voice Marvel had had at that point. But for whatever reason, when Roy took over as Editor-in-Chief he decided to let us all be ourselves. So it was being young, in New York City, a part of the whole comic book reality, being the 70’s and complete creative freedom. We were just looking for anything and everything that would make an interesting comic book story. Marvel was humming on all cylinders, and we wanted to hum along with it. We wanted to take it in new directions and new worlds. All of that was there, and so space and the cosmic aspect of things was something we all got into. When “Star Wars” came out, a bunch of us went down to some theater in New York and saw it, and I remember saying to the people I was with, “There's a Marvel comic on screen!” That was the first time you’d seen something that looked like a Marvel comic in a movie, and I bet if you asked George Lucas, he might tell you he got his inspiration from the comics. But it is true that we were doing it before other media—partly because it was easier to do that kind of story in comics. All you had to do was find someone to draw it and someone to publish it, then it was practically a done deal. Marvel.com: It seemed that a lot of this led from Roy writing CAPTAIN MARVEL and bringing the Kree into things in a big way. Then Jim Starlin brought Thanos and Drax into IRON MAN. And then you had a number of stories in that vein between AVENGERS and the introduction of Star-Lord. Was part of this just that you'd see each other’s pages and pick up on similar ideas? Steve Englehart: I think so. I think you're right on point. In those days, if you worked in comics at all, you got all the comics from the publishers for free. So everybody not only was sort of living in proximity to everyone else doing comics, but you were always aware of what’s going on in comics. In those days, anything in comics was probably known so you drew off any good idea that you saw anywhere. Marvel.com: One of the biggest series you did in this era was AVENGERS where you were given the biggest characters at Marvel and the biggest playground you’d had up to that point. At the same time, you introduced one of your early cosmic characters in Mantis as a huge part of the book. How did that affect the kind of risks you were taking in your own writing? Steve Englehart: It was certainly a lynchpin in my evolution as a writer. When I took over AVENGERS—and to this day I'm not exactly sure why Roy chose me—I wanted to keep the feel of Roy’s AVENGERS which I thought was a really, really good book. I wanted to do as good or better, so I tried to do Roy’s book for about six or eight months. I tried to make it sound in my head how I thought Roy would have done it, and I really wasn’t satisfied with that. I was starting to realize that I had my own voice as a writer, and I trying to be Roy wasn’t going to get me there. So I looked around for a way to shake up the group. I wasn’t going to break up the Avengers, but I could have Hawkeye leave, which I did. Still, that had been done. So I came up with this idea of a woman who would come in as a sort of femme fatale and put the male Avengers through their paces. I came up with this character named Mantis, and she sort of took over. I had this idea that she’d mess with the guys, but as soon as I got her in the book, I got into the situation of doing the Avengers/Defenders clash. I had to make her a good member of the team right then because that whole story was about different teams of people fighting. And it shaped her! After she became a good team member, I couldn’t make her a disruptive force anymore. So her ambitions settled on the Vision rather than all the men, and things kind of settled in from there. All of the sudden I had this character where half of her backstory no longer applied in my mind. The stuff I thought I knew about her, I didn’t know about her anymore. So in filling that backstory in, I started to draw on what was out there, and she became more and more cosmic. The specific idea for me with cosmic was that I had written Dr. Strange in DEFENDERS as a magician super hero amidst all these other weird heroes. But Frank Brunner had become the artist on Dr. Strange in MARVEL PREMIERE, and when Gardner Fox left that book, Frank asked if I would write Dr. Strange for him. So when I was confronted with writing Dr. Strange solo, I realized I had to know more about magic. I thought, “If I'm going to write a guy who knows all this stuff, I can have him talk about the Crimson Bands of Cyttorak and all that stuff, but it’d be nice to know what magicians actually do.” So I read up on magic, and that leads you into the cosmic worldview. Once I’d opened myself up to that, it got used in a lot of other places in my work. When it was time to fill in the backstory of Mantis, I added a piece from that and then another piece, and eventually she married a tree. [Laughs] She became the Celestial Madonna, but that was all very organic. I was in the midst of all these different influences so I'd stick it all together, and it would lead me to the next big idea. That was the most fun part of writing for me in those days: going down the road untraveled and seeing what was there. I liked being on the cutting edge of stories and flying by the seat of your pants. Marvel.com: That Celestial Madonna idea also plays into one of the most popular ideas associated with cosmic super heroes which was pushing the characters to be “Cosmically Aware” which seemed the end point of a lot of the world building that had happened in early Marvel Comics with the introduction of the Inhumans or the Negative Zone as more far out spaces. Did you all feel the need to push the boundaries on that front? Steve Englehart: I’m aware that Jack Kirby was interested in cosmic stuff. He liked the gods and all that stuff, so I think it’s fairly well accepted that a lot of that stuff comes from what he and Stan did. That said it is true that you have to open up new avenues after you’ve been doing a book for a while, and the 70’s was a time of mind expansion and all that stuff. Marvel.com: Your other major contribution at this time was the character of Star-Lord who debuted in an issue of Marvel's black and white MARVEL PREVIEW magazine issue #4 in a story you did with Steve Gan. Were those magazines a bit of a playground to try even more non-traditional ideas? Steve Englehart: I don’t think those magazines fell under the Comics Code. I can’t actually swear to that now it’s so far in the past, but it was supposed to be more adult—or adult as defined at that point in Marvel Comics history. It wasn’t like doing a completely different thing. It was an extension with fewer boundaries. It was part of the same writing gestalt, as far as I’m concerned. I do think that for some of those books, the impetus was to try and get eyeballs on the newsstands. You had to compete with Time Magazine and everything else, so anything you could do to open up a new niche and take up some space, the publishers were happy to do. Marvel.com: Even though you only wrote the first issue, Star-Lord certainly has a memorable origin, one current GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY writer Brian Michael Bendis has cited as a huge inspiration for the current run. What were the origins of the character for you, and what’s it like to see what Peter Quill has become? Steve Englehart: Comics back in those days were basically assigned. Frank Brunner could go in and say, “I want Steve Englehart to write Dr. Strange,” but he had to get Roy's approval, and Roy had to say yes. And I took whatever job they gave me, be it AVENGERS or if they said, “We've started a new black and white magazine, and we want a new space character for it. Do what you want.” Again, that was the editorial directive at the time: “Do what you want.” So I came up with this guy, and what I wanted to do—which still looms large in my mind even though it doesn't mean much in the grand scheme of Star-Lord at this point—was build a 12-issue run around the zodiac. Like I said, I’d been studying magic and astrology at that point, and I thought, “Wouldn't it be interesting if a guy started at the sun and worked his way outward by having a different adventure on each planet tied to the mythological/astrological background of that planet?” So there would be a love story on Venus and a war story on Mars. And I wanted to have a different artist on each one with a romance artist drawing the Venus story or Joe Kubert drawing the war book. But that was the idea. In order to make that happen and make that guy’s journey makes sense as he expanded out through the universe I decided to make him the most anti-social, sociopathic, repellant guy ever to start with. So in that first storyline, Peter Quill was this total jerk who would end up at the center of the solar system before having this 12-issue run where he’d grow and learn and eventually become “the Star-Lord.” I blocked this all out in my brain while planning to write the other 11 issues on the fly. So I wrote a character that I didn’t even like, which was a novel concept for starting a series. But then after I wrote the first issue in which he’s a complete jerk, I left the company and never got to finish that idea. Meanwhile, Chris Claremont and other people did various other Star-Lord stories where they tried to salvage that character. But Star-Lord never really caught on anywhere until 2008 when the Guardians of the Galaxy took him. To me, Peter Quill was always a truncated epic, and to see him come around again—albeit mellowed out—is amazing to me. I did create a whole bunch of different characters along the line, and he’s the least likely character I'd expect to see in a movie! [Laughs] And yet, I’ll take it. I’m certainly enjoying seeing this stuff all over, and I owe a great debt of thanks to [GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY writers Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning] for putting him into their book. For more of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, visit marvel.com/75 and join the conversation on Twitter with the hash tag #Marvel75
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The Mad Titan Returns in Thanos: The Infinity Revelation (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
The Mad Titan Returns The Mad Titan embarks on a new journey this week in Marvel's "Guardians of the Galaxy." Before that, travel back to his roots. Marvel is proud to present a new look at THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION, the next original graphic novel in Marvel’s all new OGN line, by the character's original creator Jim Starlin. Featuring the world’s most popular characters brought to life by the best creators, Marvel’s new OGNs debut in a high-end, oversized format featuring sophisticated packaging and design. THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION sees comic master Jim Starlin (THE INFINITY GAUNTLET, CAPTAIN MARVEL) return to his most famous creation, Thanos, for an all-new adventure: a crusade that will cross paths with the Guardians of the Galaxy, Adam Warlock, the Silver Surfer, the Annihilators and ultimately his one true love, Death! With his once sworn enemy Adam Warlock at his side, Thanos will square off against the most powerful beings in the universe. But to what ends? And when the dust settles, what will remain? Prepare yourself as comic legend Jim Starlin returns to the cosmic arena for a tale of death and rebirth that will leave the Mad Titan changed in THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION! Additionally, this original graphic novel will include a code for a bonus digital edition of THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION, redeemable via the Marvel Comics app (for iPhone®, iPad®, iPad Touch® & Android devices) and online in the Marvel Digital Comics Shop. This code is included at no extra charge, allowing fans to keep their copy of THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION safe on their bookshelves but still carry this exciting story with them on the go to read anytime, anywhere! THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION is on sale wherever comics and books are sold next Wednesday, August 6! THANOS: THE INFINITY REVELATION OGN (APR140765) Written by JIM STARLIN Art & Cover by JIM STARLIN On Sale 08/06/14!
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Follow the History of Daredevil Pt. 15 (Wed, 30 Jul 2014)
Follow the History of Daredevil In 1964, Marvel premiered one of its enduring and exciting super heroes, Daredevil. Whether in his secret identity as blind lawyer Matt Murdock or using his enhanced radar senses, DD stood out from the crowd as an unrelenting crusader for justice. To celebrate 75 years of Marvel, 50 years of the Man Without Fear and the upcoming debut of “Marvel’s Daredevil” on Netflix in 2015, we look back on the hero of Hell’s Kitchen’s remarkable history! Another year marked by tragedy and turmoil, 1978 broke Matt Murdock’s heart and forced him into fights with friends and foes alike. The thug that kidnapped Matt Murdock’s girlfriend Heather Glenn hired the mercenary Paladin in DAREDEVIL #150 to track down the source of all his woes: the hypnotic Purple Man. Unfortunately, this placed Paladin in Daredevil’s path, but the two adventurers worked out their differences and parted on good terms. Back at Heather’s apartment, Matt decided to reveal his secret identity in DAREDEVIL #151, but news of her father’s suicide over guilt he felt from the Purple Man’s influence sent Heather over the edge. Blaming Matt for everything, she stormed out and subsequently disappeared. Matt took on the Thing’s property damage case in MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #37, but circumstances turned on him and the court sentenced Ben Grimm to prison. Seeking proof of his client’s innocence, Matt stood at Ben’s side as Daredevil in MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #38 to track down the real culprits, only to wind up as the Mad Thinker’s prisoners. Captured, DD agreed to the Thinker’s terms: bring him the synthezoid Vision and the Thing would live. Grimm and Hornhead brought in the Vision in MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #39, but then turned the tables on the villain with the aid of clever ruse involving Yellowjacket and a few thousand ants. Burying his sorrows over Heather by trying to reunite Foggy Nelson and his girlfriend Debbie in DAREDEVIL #152, Matt once again clashed with Paladin while on the trail of the Purple Man. Then, rushing to Heather’s apartment believing he could save her, Daredevil fell under the combined onslaught of Mr. Hyde and Cobra in DAREDEVIL #153. With his billy club destroyed by Hyde, our hero faced off against an arena of enemies, including the Gladiator, the Jester, Mr. Hyde, and Cobra, all under the Purple Man’s staggering influence in DAREDEVIL #154. Once the dust cleared from the melee, Matt met a young man seeking legal counsel for his ailing aunt in MARVEL TEAM-UP #73. Interrupted by an attack from the Owl, Daredevil pondered the villain’s return from the dead while Peter Parker changed into Spider-Man to clash with some goons. Once the two heroes tracked him to his lair, the Owl ultimately shorted out the neurological device that enabled his consciousness in a blaze of overloading fury. Back on his own in DAREDEVIL #155, a series of strange headaches sent Daredevil reeling, but that didn’t stop him from swinging over to Avengers Mansion to confront a visiting Black Widow and throw down with a few of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes for good measure. Read more DAREDEVIL (1964) on Marvel Unlimited
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Marvel 75: The Deadly Genesis of the All-New X-Men Pt. 2 (Tue, 29 Jul 2014)
Marvel 75: The Deadly Genesis Storm, Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Colossus—all names instantly associated with the X-Men whether you’re a lifelong mutant devotee or a newcomer familiar with the team's multimedia presence over the past few decades. But those four characters have not always been at the forefront of Marvel's mutant movement. A little over 40 years ago, they didn't even exist, and the X-Men as a franchise had been placed on life support, maintained in name only as a reprint title for the team’s 60’s adventures. The Marvel Universe had left the X-Men behind, relegating them to cameos in their actual hit titles. That all changed with GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1. Writer Len Wein—who had just created Wolverine a year earlier in INCREDIBLE HULK #180—and artist Dave Cockrum had reimagined the team as a ragtag group of international do-gooders with personalities as colorful as their costumes. In the second installment in our three-part interview series with Wein, we'll learn just where Storm earned the name Ororo, and how 1960’s bit players Sunfire and Banshee got promoted to full-time X-Men! Marvel.com: Like the title indicates, GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1 is a giant-sized issue that introduced a lot of new characters. Did this comic take longer to create? Were you guys on a tight deadline with this one? Len Wein: Not really. It had been talked about for years. There wasn’t really a tight deadline, and we didn't take that long. As I’ve gotten older and I’ve been doing this now for almost half a century, sometimes there are months where it gets harder to write and my wife says, “Why? It should be easier, you’ve been doing this for half a century.” And I go, “The problem, honey, is that I’ve used up all the words.” In these later days, when I’ve termed that phrase before, I've used that image, I’ve done this. So you have to spend time coming up with new things that you’ve never written. Back then we had not done anywhere near as much as we’ve done [since] so it was a lot easier because it was all new to us too. Marvel.com: With this roster of characters coming from all over the globe, how did you do research on those particular places? Now we have the Internet and we can just go find out facts about Germany, but I imagine it must have been more difficult to research Kenya and Russia in 1975. Len Wein: The weird turn of the story, and I’ll answer your question in just a second, is that the whole idea of doing this as an international team with certain characters from certain countries, is a great concept. But the guy from upstairs never came downstairs to tell us which countries [Marvel Comics] were successful in. So Dave and I decided on our own who was gonna be from where, that we liked the team logic, in terms of mixing it up. To this day, if I had made Storm, I want to say Ugandan as opposed to Kenyan, it might have sold much better, but no one told us where we were supposed to get these characters from. And as far as research, I have always researched every time I do a new book, every time I take a character to a new place. Nowadays, as you stated, [it’s] much easier. I never have to leave my office. I can sit here and Google and Wiki or do whatever. But those days there used to be this ancient, archaic kind of building called a “library” and I would go to the library! I’d spend a day in there. That's where I got Ororo! I started researching the Swahili language and Ororo means beautiful—that’s where she got her name. I’d spend a day or two in the library researching, making notes. Just like it was back in the days of Lincoln! Marvel.com: When we first meet Storm in GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1, you have a caption that says, “Her eyes are crystal blue and older than time.” I was wondering how old you intended for Storm to be at that point? Len Wein: Oh, about 18 or 19. Marvel.com: I didn’t know if you were implying that she might be more divine or an actual goddess or something like that. Len Wein: No, no, that was just artistic license. Marvel.com: Actually the very first new character that we meet in GIANT-SIZE is Nightcrawler, the character that you said previously was deemed too demonic for DC. Was there a reason why you specifically started with Nightcrawler in this issue? Len Wein: Not that I can remember, no. It may have just like a great way to set up the problems that mutants were having, but I don't recall after 40 years. Marvel.com: He is the first X-Men whose powers are physical to the point where he can't blend in with everyone else. That makes him a really good entry point character. Do you remember what fan reaction to Wolverine was at that time? Had Wolverine’s first full appearance in INCREDIBLE HULK #181 been out long enough that you maybe had a sense of his popularity? Len Wein: Yeah, it was six months to a year earlier. And they liked him. I mean, nobody was going, “Oh my god, this is such an amazing character!” It was just another character and they liked him. It was my never my plan, originally, or Dave Cockrum’s, frankly, to star Wolverine in the book. If you look at the cover to GIANT-SIZE, the guy who’s up in the center and in the primary super hero colors is Colossus. We thought he was gonna be a star, we just were crazy about him. And things worked out as they worked out. Marvel.com: In this issue, Colossus is characterized as a good-hearted kid that loves his family and is very awestruck by everything around him. Was he intended to be the audience’s entry point character into this new world? Len Wein: Yes. He’s an easy-going farm boy. That's all he really was at heart, he started out with more than he could deal with. Marvel.com: Yeah, he even has this great reaction to the clothes he gets from Professor X. He's like, “The fabric is so amazing.” It's very relatable. Len Wein: It’s unstable molecules! Marvel.com: It lets you get away with so much! Len Wein: Exactly. Marvel.com: You also brought Banshee and Sunfire to the team after having appeared in the 60’s. What led you to bringing those two characters back as official X-Men this time? Len Wein: Well, the idea of an international X-Men team! We had an Irishman, we had a Japanese warrior, that's perfect! Let’s add it to our mix! I never intended to keep Sunfire around. He was a pain in the ass but I wanted a Japanese guy in that first story. I kept Banshee around because I loved writing an Irish brogue. Marvel.com: This is also the first time we get to see Banshee’s personality come into play because mostly in the sixties he was a mind-controlled henchman. Len Wein: Exactly. Marvel.com: So what kind of thought did you put into Banshee's personality and fleshing him out? Len Wein: I just wanted someone who was essentially an easy-going guy who was “Hail fellow, well-met!” Your classic Irishman. I like writing Irish accents and I thought that it’d be fun to play with him for a while. And he was different visually. He wasn't really a good-looking guy. He had kinda that old, it’s been punched once too often Irish face. Marvel.com: I do have to say, personally, I'm from Tennessee, so I remember reading that he was recruited in the Grand Ole Opry and that really meant a lot to me as a little kid, “The Grand Ole Opry's in the Marvel Universe! That's amazing!” Len Wein: Yeah, that's because I thought it was fun to have an Irishman who loved country music. Marvel.com: I loved it. Also, are there cameos in his panel at Grand Ole Opry attendees? Are you in that panel? Len Wein: Yeah, I’m in there. So is Dave and Dave’s wife Paty. We’re all in that shot! In the final installment in our celebration of the All-New, All-Different X-Men, the team faces the threat of Krakoa—the island that walks like a man! Get more 75th anniversary goodness at marvel.com/75 and join the conversation on Twitter with the hash tag #Marvel75!
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Follow Falcon's Journey from Sidekick to Sentinel Of Liberty (Tue, 29 Jul 2014)
Follow Falcon's Journey From Sidekick To Sentinel Of Liberty 45 years after he made history as the first African American super hero, the Falcon will once again kick off a new era in Marvel Comics when he takes on the title of Captain America in ALL-NEW CAPTAIN AMERICA #1 by Rick Remender and Stuart Immonen. While this promotion may be the biggest change Sam Wilson has made in his lengthy career, it's far from the first. Sam's been growing and evolving ever since his debut, and now you can follow his evolution with this rundown of some of his biggest moments! Falcon first appeared in this issue of CAPTAIN AMERICA from 1969. You can get a full run-through of the events depicted in this monumental issue from our recent Wish Falcon A Happy 45th Birthday article. With his introduction into the Marvel Universe complete—wearing his original green and orange get-up—Falcon began his journey to picking up the shield. After a period of time partnered with Captain America, Falcon wished to make more of a name for himself. Sam's new costume, a striking red and white number, acted as a declaration of independence from the star-spangled Avenger and helped him establish his own identity. This issue features the Falcon striking off on his own to do battle against a group of drug pushers. It's hard to believe that it took the Falcon almost five years and over 50 issues to acquire his trademark accessory: his red glider wings! The wings made their debut in this issue as a costume upgrade courtesy of the Black Panther. The genius inventor's gift enabled the Falcon to finally live up to his namesake. Falcon first flew solo in this back-up feature wherein he tangled with an all-new enemy—one whose biggest crime just so happened to be his costume's color scheme. Okay, the bad guy also kidnapped Sam's pet falcon Redwing, something that he immediately regretted once the winged hero jumped into action. Said winged hero became the winged Avenger in this issue. The Avengers needed Falcon's assistance so badly that he had to jump into action before filling out his stack of Earth's Mightiest Paperwork. Falcon's career as an Avenger elevated his status in the Marvel Universe even higher. Sam Wilson sought to elevate his civilian identity's status as well starting in this series of back-up stories in CAPTAIN AMERICA. Already a well-regarded social worker in Harlem, Wilson launched a congressional campaign so that he could be a force for positive change on a whole new front. His campaign didn’t run smoothly, however, as tabloids and political enemies set about damaging his reputation by exposing aspects of his past. After years serving on a number of different Avengers line-ups, the Falcon recently paid a visit to Manhattan's Gem Theater—home of Luke Cage and his team of mighty Avengers. Sam Wilson offered to help the team in their mission to be the people's Avengers, signing up to answer hotline calls and protect New York City neighborhoods usually neglected by super heroes. Sam Wilson will be taking on a whole new relationship with the mighty Avengers, though, just as soon as he gets that new title. CAPTAIN AMERICA & THE MIGHTY AVENGERS will see the team's dynamic shifted and profile raised as Sam Wilson becomes the all-new Captain America! Check out Sam Wilson's new adventures this fall in ALL-NEW CAPTAIN AMERICA #1 and CAPTIAN AMERICA & THE MIGHTY AVENGERS #1!
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Marvel 75: The Deadly Genesis of the All-New X-Men Pt. 1 (Mon, 28 Jul 2014)
Deadly Genesis of the All-New X-Men Storm, Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Colossus—all names instantly associated with the X-Men whether you’re a lifelong mutant devotee or a newcomer familiar with the team's multimedia presence over the past few decades. But those four characters have not always been at the forefront of Marvel's mutant movement. A little over 40 years ago, they didn't even exist, and the X-Men as a franchise had been placed on life support, maintained in name only as a reprint title for the team’s 60’s adventures. The Marvel Universe had left the X-Men behind, relegating them to cameos in their actual hit titles. That all changed with GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1. Released in the spring of 1975, this double-sized single issue re-introduced the X-Men as a team of international super heroes bound together by their genetic gifts and a desire to help the world. Len Wein, incoming Editor-in-Chief and regular writer of DEFENDERS and INCREDIBLE HULK, reinvented the team alongside legendary artist Dave Cockrum as a ragtag group of do-gooders with personalities as colorful as their costumes. In this three-part interview with Len Wein, we'll revisit this milestone issue in detail, uncovering everything from the creation of the new team and beyond! Marvel.com: What was your position at Marvel at the time that GIANT-SIZE X-MEN came about in May 1975? Len Wein: I was quarterback at the time. That was my position. [Laughs] No, seriously, by the time this whole thing came around I ended up—when we actually started producing it—as Editor-in-Chief. I had been [previous Editor-in-Chief] Roy Thomas’ assistant and when it all actually began—it started before I even got to Marvel, I think, the vague idea of doing this new X-Men. There was a businessperson from upstairs whose name I will never remember who had noticed that in a lot of the foreign countries that the Marvel books were being distributed in, the books were selling very well. He had this idea of, if we do an international group of X-Men, we can possibly sell really, really well in the countries where the books do well if we include characters from those countries. So that had been the initial idea. I think someone had given it to Roy and Roy said, “Oh, so we can basically do the Blackhawks,” which were an international team of fliers over at DC and before that at Quality [Comics]. And that’s how it started. Marvel.com: Did you already have a relationship with the 1960’s X-MEN series? Were you attached to them at all? Len Wein: Back in those days I read everything, so I had read all of the original X-MEN books. I was never a huge fan of that book. It was the book that [creators] Stan [Lee] and Jack [Kirby] probably left earliest in the run of books they created. And once they left, it—for the most part—went rapidly downhill. It had a couple of other shining moments; there were a couple of issues by [artist Jim] Steranko in the middle there, and of course the Neal Adams/Roy Thomas run that was the end of the originals was just great. Marvel.com: You said the idea of re-launching the X-Men started before you even got to Marvel. How did you get the job of making it happen? Len Wein: Roy gave it to me. I actually had not expected to be the person writing that book. In fact, when I created Wolverine [in INCREDIBLE HULK #180], I was aware of the potential of the book coming along, and so I made Wolverine a mutant specifically so that whoever ended up with the gig could have a Canadian mutant to play with and see how it went from there. Marvel.com: Dave Cockrum was already brought on board before you got involved, from what I understand. Len Wein: I think so. It was relatively close together, but I think Dave got there first. Marvel.com: He’d already had a number of characters designed like Storm and Nightcrawler and Colossus. How did you go about working with those designs?   Len Wein: He had a number of designs drawn, most of whom had nothing but the visual. He was a great visual designer and he spent a lot of time, as any young artist—and God knows we were all so young back then—just in his spare time sitting over the breakfast table or wherever, sketching out possible characters. The only one he had then that was fully fleshed out was Nightcrawler, who he had designed when he was drawing the Legion of Super-Heroes for DC and hoped to make a Legionnaire, but Murray Boltinoff, the editor at the time, said, “Nah, he's too damn creepy and looks demonic and [we] can’t use him.” So he sat [on Nightcrawler] until the X-Men came along, and when we sat down together—Dave and I—to figure out who they were going to be, the one thing Dave said was, “He's gotta be one of them.” He showed me the visual and I went, “Done! That’s not hard. You betcha. I love this guy.” He was probably the first member after Wolverine that became an X-Man. The others were all just visuals. There were no characters with them. Storm, in fact, wasn’t even Storm. I'll explain that in a minute. Colossus came along next. The basic costume was a little dizzy. We simplified it a bit by eliminating a couple of minor elements. We decided to make him Russian and I came up with the name Colossus. And then there were two other characters. One was a character named Tempest, I think, who was a weather wizard. And then there was a very cool visual, but not so cool character, called the Black Cat, that was what Storm was originally. We could not make the two of them work. We pretty much had the group as we wanted it and we were just having trouble getting a finger or a handle on who the Black Cat and who Tempest were. And we went to Roy, who was still editor at the time, and said, “Roy, this is your job. What do we do? We’re really blanked. We can’t get these two to work as well as we want it to.” And he said, “Well, one’s a great visual, the other’s a great power with a not so great visual, why don't you make one character out of them?” And thus came Storm. Marvel.com: And history was made. Len Wein: Exactly! Dave took the basic Black Cat costume, added the cape and a few other elements to it and, in fact, if you look at those early issues, when she's using her powers she has these kind of cat’s eyes. That is our leftover from the incarnation of the Black Cat because we just thought it was so damn cool we didn’t want to get rid of them. [Laughs] Remember, we were all kids back then. The funny part of all of this, we decided, together Dave and I decided that Ororo would be Kenyan and Nightcrawler would be German and Colossus would be Russian. Wolverine was already established as a Canadian. We put in an American into the group that was Thunderbird, but Thunderbird was designed to be killed off in the end of the second story. The whole idea being that it had never happened before that we could remember and we thought, “This is great, we can come up with a character and kill him off and the audience will never get complacent.” They’ll never go, “Oh, they won't kill him, because you can't kill your heroes!” So we killed one right off the bat and—thank God—he’s arguably one of the very few characters in the history of the business who actually stayed dead. They brought in his kid brother later on with virtually the same powers but changed the name to Warpath from Thunderbird. Marvel.com: And Warpath has a very different personality too. Thunderbird’s personality was very specific. Len Wein: John Proudstar kicked the bucket and stayed in the bucket. Marvel 75’s celebration of the All-New, All-Different X-Men with Len Wein continues tomorrow as the writer reveals how Sunfire and Banshee got into the mix! Get more 75th anniversary goodness at marvel.com/75 and join the conversation on Twitter with the hash tag #Marvel75!
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Thanos at SDCC 2014 - Watch Marvel Super Heroes: What The--?! Ep. 34 (Mon, 28 Jul 2014)
Marvel Super Heroes: What The--?! Thanos returns to Comic-Con...but what indignities await the Mad Titan in Villains Alley? Also featuring the Guardians of the Galaxy, Ultron, Deadpool and more!Watch the latest Marvel Super Heroes: What The--?! Marvel Super Heroes: What The--?!
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SDCC 2014: Death of Wolverine (Mon, 28 Jul 2014)
Death of Wolverine Coming this November, DEATH OF WOLVERINE writer Charles Soule and stories X-Men artist Salvador Larroca reveal the beginnings of a new threat in the five-issue DEATH OF WOLVERINE: THE WEAPON X PROGRAM limited series. How does this new WEAPON X PROGAM connect to events yet to unfold in DEATH OF WOLVERINE and THE LOGAN LEGACY? We catch up with Soule and Larroca to get some enticing clues and much more! Marvel.com: What interested you most about tackling this new WEAPON X PROGRAM story? Charles Soule: Well, let me point out right off the bat that the story here, while tied to the original Weapon X program in some ways, takes off from and goes to entirely new places. I don't think Salvador or I would be interested in just retelling stories we’ve already read. Weapon X has been a very cool story engine, but I was [interested] in taking some of its concepts and moving forward with them. We’ve already seen a lot of stories about the super-cool super-soldiers that spin out of research programs like Weapon X—this is something different, and that’s what interested me. Salvador Larroca: Any history about Weapon X is interesting, in and of itself, so we’ll try to expand this mythology to a new level. Marvel.com: Without giving too much away, how quickly will we learn more about the mysterious figure in the shadows from DEATH OF WOLVERINE? Charles Soule: It’s a fairly organic process. I like layered reveals, where you start with one premise and then it evolves as you learn more about the characters and their situations. So, we’ll understand what was happening in DEATH OF WOLVERINE fairly early, but it’s more about where it goes that will be important for both THE LOGAN LEGACY and this story. Marvel.com: Can you give a hint of how THE WEAPON X PROGRAM has ties to THE LOGAN LEGACY limited series? Charles Soule: They’re very tightly linked, to a degree that it’s proving to be an extremely challenging task to make sure everything matches up the way we all want it to. Without spoiling too much, LOGAN LEGACY #1 starts at a certain point in the stories of a whole bunch of very cool characters; folks like Sabretooth, and X-23, and many others, including a bunch of new guys that spin out of DEATH OF WOLVERINE.  Then, the two series diverge both in time and characters, to see how every got to that point. Then, we’ll pick them all up again after we’ve learned a ton about them, where they are, their motivations, how they’ll work together, and so on. It’s a little dizzying, but now that it’s almost completely written I feel pretty good about the way the puzzle pieces all fit together. I think of the 12 issues—seven of LOGAN LEGACY and five of the WEAPON title—as being one big, incredibly cool story that’s going to feel very rich and exciting. Wolverine’s gone, but that doesn't mean we don't have great stories to tell. In fact, his absence gives us opportunities we’d never otherwise have, and I’m very jazzed about that. Marvel.com: Again without giving away critical details, can you talk about what kind of action scenes and settings you find yourself drawing courtesy of Charles’ scripts? Salvador Larroca: As a professional, I’ll try to fit my skills to the writing in order to tell this story properly. I’m sure we'll have strong visuals here. As a fan, I’m sure I’ll enjoy Charles stories—I love his stuff. Marvel.com: Do you make suggestions to the colorist as to ways to heighten the level of danger and suspense to the narrative? Salvador Larroca: Yes, I send suggestions to the colorist, in order to enhance the necessary feeling required in every shot. I have done that for years. Marvel.com: You are one of Marvel's most beloved X-Men artists. What is it about the X-Universe that clearly connects with you and causes you to love working in that universe so much? Salvador Larroca: Well, I grew up reading and loving these characters, they’re my family. Marvel.com: Can we look forward to any unexpected guest stars or other types of surprises in DEATH OF WOLVERINE: THE WEAPON X PROGRAM? Charles Soule: Of course! That’s part of the fun of comics. There’s a weird bad guy who shows up in issue #1, someone more associated with Deadpool than anyone else. Issue #3 has a huge cameo, and then issues #4 and #5 have their share of surprises too. The whole thing is a giant puzzle box—again, those layered reveals—and I almost can’t believe it all works. But it seems to! Marvel.com: In terms of this collaboration what have you most enjoyed about working with each other? Salvador Larroca: Teaming with such a talented guy is always a pleasure; I’m sure that readers will enjoy this new [creative] team! Charles Soule: I agree. I’ve enjoyed Salvador’s work for so long, that knowing that he’ll be drawing these scenes is wonderful.  Honestly, all you can do when you write a story like this is put your story in the hands of the artist and hope for the best. With Salvador, I’m not even worried—it’ll be perfect. Missed the convention? Relive it with our coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 including the latest news, exclusive videos, image galleries and more!
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SDCC 2014: Spider-Woman (Mon, 28 Jul 2014)
Spider-Woman “Every Spider-Man ever” might the promise of Marvel’s epic fall Spider-Man event, Spider-Verse, but it’s not just the spider-men who get in on the action. Jessica Drew, the original Spider-Woman, will also have a major part to play, and the story will also launch her into her own new ongoing series from writer Dennis Hopeless and artist Greg Land. Spider-Verse brings together spider-themed heroes and villains from all kinds of different worlds. We asked Dennis and Greg to drop a few hints about where Jessica might find herself in such a tangled web, and to tell us what role new introduction Silk will play in their story. Marvel.com: Spider-Woman has a long and storied history and she's played many roles. How would you best describe her role in this new ongoing series? Dennis Hopeless: Because we’re opening the series in the middle of a big sprawling war story, Jessica plays a few different roles right out of the gate. Issue one is a little bit “Saving Private Ryan” with Jessica as Tom Hanks trying to keep her spider-platoon alive while executing a dangerous mission. Later issues will find Jessica all alone and undercover behind enemy lines. It’s hard to go into much detail without spoiling anything but these first few issues are chock full of wartime danger and intrigue. Where we go from there depends on how the Spider-Verse war turns out and who survives to the end. Marvel.com: What's Jessica’s involvement in the Spider-Verse story? Dennis Hopeless: I can’t speak to Spider-Woman’s relationship with the larger Spider-Verse story. I’d hate to accidentally spoil something cool. Within the confines of our story, Jessica is an experienced soldier who the Spider-army trusts to send on dangerous side missions. Jessica doesn’t get the easy stuff. Marvel.com: Does the story involve any of the other Spider-women? Dennis Hopeless: Yes indeed. Silk, Spider-Gwen and Anya Corazon/Spider-Girl all play big roles in our first arc. Personality differences and character quirks make writing their dialogue so much fun. Apart from being spider-powered, these women don’t have a whole lot in common, and it shows. Marvel.com: I hear there's a multi-dimensional aspect to this story, so what are you two most looking forward to exploring? Greg Land: I am looking forward to—and at the same time dreading—the challenge of imagining and designing new environments and people that have a unique look. They should look like they could possibly exist. Meaning, I want them to seem realistic even if they are alien to us; so that they have a presence in their world that makes them look logical and yet otherworldly. Dennis Hopeless: The main Spider-Verse story will be dealing with the more established alt dimensions, so we’re leaning into the dark forgotten corners of the multi-verse. I love weird sci-fi and horror so I’m looking forward to doing a bit of twisted world building. I can’t wait to see what Greg does with the crazy alternate universes we visit in issue #1. Greg Land: The animals at the start of the story should be fun to figure out. Marvel.com: Greg, what's your approach to bringing the world of Spider-Woman to the page? Greg Land: My approach to the story and characters is to gather up as much reference on them that I have. I will go through my comic collection and pull out my old Spider-Woman stuff so that I can get a feel for her—her type of movements, her powers, etc. She has such a cool graphic costume and, combined with her long flowing hair, she is going to be a blast to draw. [Editor] Nick [Lowe] said there will be some intense action scenes in the story, so I am getting pumped up to see how the page designs turn out! Marvel.com: Silk looks like an intriguing character with a very interesting visual. Are you guys excited to get a chance to help establish her? Greg Land: Silk has a very cool graphic look that will be fun to play around with. The blacks in the design are going to look powerful in different lighting situations, especially coming out of dark areas. It seems like she and Spider-Woman will be having some good verbal jabs back and forth. This gives me material for some nice, varied facial expressions and body language. Dennis Hopeless: Silk's personality makes her the perfect foil for Jessica. She has this wet-behind-the-ears enthusiasm that’s a ton of fun to write because it drives Spider-Woman completely insane. But yeah, it’s a little intimidating using a new character so early. We’ve snatched Silk straight from the AMAZING SPIDER-MAN oven and plan on beating her with various narrative sticks before giving her back. Hopefully Dan [Slott] approves. Missed the convention? Relive it with our coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 including the latest news, exclusive videos, image galleries and more!
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Go Back to School and Back to Work with Emma Frost (Mon, 28 Jul 2014)
Back To Work With Emma Frost It's Monday, and that means that you've had to find the strength to shake off the after effects of a weekend well spent just to get back into shape for the weekday work-athon. It's tough, sure, but it's a fact of life – one that isn't lost on super humans either. Yep, Mondays mean back to work for super heroes too, as they trade in their uniforms for something more business casual. And then there's Emma Frost, the schoolteacher that pushes the limits of "casual" workwear Monday through Friday. In contrast with her formerly villainous ways and powerfully suggestive attire, Ms. Frost has always put the interests of her students before her own—even if her ice-cold demeanor has hinted otherwise. Nearly every position she's held both within and outside of the X-Men's ranks has involved her instructing a young generation of mutants. Emma Frost first debuted as the White Queen of the Hellfire Club in UNCANNY X-MEN #129, wherein she tried to recruit a young mutant named Kitty Pryde into her own Massachusetts Academy. Her persuasive tactics failed and the youngster ended up enrolling at Xavier's—but that didn't stop Emma from attempting it again a few years later. Her scheme to lure Kitty to her school involved switching bodies with Storm, a feat that would nearly end up costing the White Queen her life. Frost's plans for her student body would reveal themselves later in NEW MUTANTS #16, when her own teen team of mutants—the Hellions—made their debut. After waking up from a lengthy coma only to find out that the Hellions had been murdered, Emma found a new purpose in life as the headmistress of the new Xavier's School. GENERATION X saw the former villainess creep closer to the side of good as Charles Xavier's dream of peaceful co-existence began to influence her lesson plans. She still clashed with the X-Men, as best evidenced in this issue detailing a confrontational yet educational run-in with Iceman. Emma lost another class of students during the massacre on Genosha; she only survived because of her diamond-hard skin. With no school to return to and more mutants than ever in need of an education, Emma finally joined the main X-Men team and helped the Xavier Institute open up its doors to the biggest student body it had ever seen before. Find out how Emma Frost reacts to the last will and testament of Charles Xavier in UNCANNY X-MEN #24!
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SDCC 2014: Original Sin (Sun, 27 Jul 2014)
Original Sin Nick Fury recently revealed in Original Sin his position as “the man on the wall,” the person who will do anything it takes to protect Earth from extra-terrestrial and extra-dimensional threats. Before Fury, another man held that title, and as readers discovered in ORIGINAL SIN #5, his name was Woodrow McCord, and he died saving the world from an invasion. But who was Woodrow McCord, where did he come from, and just how far did he go for the sake of humanity? In ORIGINAL SIN ANNUAL #1, writer Jason Latour welcomes extraordinary sci-fi artist and Marvel newcomer Enis Cisic to uncover the true story of the other man on the wall. Marvel.com: This “man on the wall” role is a new invention, but one that fits very comfortably in the Marvel Universe. What can you tell us about the “job” and what it involves? Jason Latour: We’ve seen a bit of how Nick Fury approached this role, and a lot of that is stuff he’s picked up very directly from McCord. The job is getting out there, rattling cages, getting in the heads of the people who want to harm Earth. Stopping trouble before it starts, by any means necessary. In the eyes of a lot of these more belligerent alien races, the Earth was ripe for the picking. It was a silent, shadow war and for quite a while McCord was the only soldier we had. So with this story we’ll delve into the reasons behind that solitude. Did protecting the Earth cost McCord his own humanity? Marvel.com: When it comes to depicting McCord and his adventures, will you guys draw on any particular pulp or sci-fi archetypes for inspiration? Enis Cisic: Since the story takes place in the past, it was natural for us to think about our hero in terms of pulp and sci-fi magazine covers, such as Amazing Stories, Weird Tales, etc. In order to get the atmosphere of that period right, I looked back at pulp icons like Flash Gordon, the Rocketeer and others. On the other hand, I wanted to create something fresh in terms of design. This “retrofitting” process resulted in a very interesting look of the character. Jason Latour: I like to think of McCord as Johnny Cash meets Jack Kirby. Tonally I don’t think that’s far from the mark. I’d say it’s very pulpy, but hopefully not handcuffed by that. Most of my knowledge of pulp comes second hand from comics and modern movies anyway, so I guess it’s maybe a more post-modern view on pulp? This is a hard edged, two fisted tale about a guy who fights aliens, but it’s also about a very lonely human being who’s looking for a way to make his life matter. Marvel.com: Enis, you must be looking forward to drawing some extraordinary things in this story. Given the scale of the Marvel Universe, what are the concepts you'd love to get to grips with? Enis Cisic: Absolutely, I am very excited to work on this incredible piece! I wanted to visually explore the design of a new Marvel hero whose roots are in the same vintage stuff that I grew up with as a kid.  Also, there is lot of alien world scenery, which is always fun for me to draw. It would be hard for me to refer to a specific part of the Marvel Universe because there are so many amazing things that I would like to work on and include in my art. Marvel.com: Are we going to see many changes to the established history of the Marvel Universe through this story? Jason Latour: The events that play out in this issue very directly impact Fury’s viewpoint and the methods by which he chooses to protect Earth.  So we’ll see a little more of how that began, and  the relationship between Fury and Howard Stark, who is kind of his begrudged ally. These men  both carry the weight of keeping secret Woodrow McCord’s mission. That mission is very much the linchpin that holds Earth’s space offensive in place, but some of the things he did  in the name of protecting the Earth are not pretty. They’re  bound to come back to haunt us. Marvel.com: We saw the death of Woodrow McCord in ORIGINAL SIN #5. Is this the last we’ll see of him? Would you guys like to do more with the character? Enis Cisic: Of course I do! There is a great amount of potential in this fellow. Jason Latour: I think there’s definitely some more fun to be had exploring the parts of the Marvel Universe that McCord’s touched, or left as smoldering rubble as the case may be. But as for his death, well—we’re operating under the assumption that Nick Fury’s telling the truth about what happened to McCord. For now I’m inclined to believe him…but with Fury you never really know. Do you? Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: S.H.I.E.L.D. (Sun, 27 Jul 2014)
S.H.I.E.L.D. The agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. have been promoted to the Level Eight equivalent of Marvel Comics—their own ongoing series! After spending time in the background of books like SECRET AVENGERS and INDESTRUCTIBLE HULK, the super spy organization will de-cloak and command attention in a series of high-octane adventures written by Mark Waid with a rotating roster of special ops artists. The series springs into action this December with a thrilling escapade illustrated by Carlos Pacheco. Agent Pacheco will then pass the mission on to the likes Alan Davis and Chris Sprouse for the second and third outings, ensuring that every issue of S.H.I.E.L.D. will be a dynamically drawn affair. We spoke to incoming Writer of S.H.I.E.L.D. Mark Waid about his battle plan for the series—one that involves a few familiar faces and one helper monkey! Marvel.com: What’s your history with S.H.I.E.L.D.? Are you a fan going back to the Jim Steranko days? Mark Waid: Absolutely. What set that series apart and helped it hold its own with the flashy super hero books was Steranko’s sense of style and design coupled with an unparalleled imagination. I’ve been eager to follow in those footsteps since I was a kid! Marvel.com: What sets S.H.I.E.L.D. apart from every other fictional spy organization that’s out there? Mark Waid: They have the best toys. Also, the best allies—anyone and everyone in the Marvel Universe is a potential guest-star in this book, from Doctor Strange to the Thing to Spider-Man to Cloak and Dagger to Groot—if they’ve got the specific skills needed for the task at hand, they’re on the front lines—like it or not. Marvel.com: You played with the S.H.I.E.L.D. setup a little bit in your INDESTRUCTIBLE HULK series. Will we be seeing any of the characters you introduced in that series carry over to this one? Mark Waid: A few, yes. I’ll certainly throw the spotlight back on some of the characters that showed up there—but not at the sacrifice of one Phil Coulson, maybe the coolest S.H.I.E.L.D. agent ever not named “Fury.” Marvel.com: That being said, it appears that Agent Coulson will be the lead character in this new S.H.I.E.L.D. series. What about Coulson appeals to you as a writer? Mark Waid: He is the coolest Marvel Comics fan ever. E-V-E-R. He’s amazing at his job, he’s badass, he’s funny—and he loves the history of the Marvel Universe as much as I do. Marvel.com: You’ll probably get to explore a lot of Marvel history with the series’ done-in-one approach to issues. Are those types of stories more difficult than multi-part story arcs? Mark Waid: Done-in-one stories are more challenging, no doubt—and every story will focus on one mission, yes—but I’d be very surprised if there weren't some evidence of some common thread once we got rolling, something to give each set of issues more of an arc. Marvel.com: Is it possible that some agents from ABC's “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” will make their Marvel debuts here, or is that still Level Eight classified info? Mark Waid: Oh, we’re definitely bringing the gang in, from May to Fitz and Simmons and beyond. They're the Marvel Universe “versions” of these characters, which gives us license to really delve into them in ways that are tough with limited screen time each week. Marvel.com: You have Carlos Pacheco on the first issue, followed by a rotating crew of artists including Alan Davis and Chris Sprouse. Are you tailoring each issue to the artists’ strengths? Mark Waid: I’d be a fool not to. Carlos is great at panoramic adventure, though, and he’s the best and most fitting leadoff batter. Marvel.com: Can we find out a little more about this mysterious helper monkey? Mark Waid: Her name is [editor] Ellie Pyle. Oh, wait, you mean the one in the comic. Look, Leo Fitz has been asking for a helper monkey throughout season one of [“Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”]. Giving him one seems like a proper “welcome to the Marvel Universe” gift, no? Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Uncanny X-Men (Sun, 27 Jul 2014)
Uncanny X-Men To paraphrase a popular saying in the X-Men's corner of the Marvel Universe: “Welcome to the X-Men, Tempus—but how did you survive the experience?!” The charmingly down-to-earth Eva Bell quickly became a fan favorite character after her introduction in 2012’s ALL-NEW X-MEN #1, and her popularity has followed her to UNCANNY X-MEN where she regularly appears alongside Cyclops’ ragtag team of revolutionaries. But all’s not well with the mutant codenamed Tempus. During a training session in the man-eating jungles of Tabula Rasa, Tempus disappeared from the group. While it only appeared like a quick separation to her teammates, Eva’s powers had actually kicked-in, leaving her to fend for herself in a temporally frozen world for an undisclosed amount of time! Now the truth will be revealed in UNCANNY X-MEN ANNUAL #1, starring Tempus! Alongside artist Andrea Sorrentino, who makes his Marvel debut with this tell-all tale, writer Brian Michael Bendis will reveal just what Eva Bell saw and experienced during her time away. Will her relationship with the X-Men survive the experience? Bendis and editor Mike Marts answer our questions about the revealing Annual. Marvel.com: This annual focuses on Tempus and the time she spent trapped alone in her time bubble. Was this story in mind from the moment Eva stepped out of the woods back in UNCANNY X-MEN #17? Brian Michael Bendis: It is of the utmost grandest X-Men tradition to have your mutant power be the coolest thing about you and the scariest thing about you. Eva has a very interesting and scary power set. It was only a matter of time before she was thrust into a situation that revealed the scary side of her time related powers. This was in my mind during the initial creation stage of the character, but it’s one of those ideas you have to hold onto because it only works if you know the character a little. Marvel.com: Eva Bell has been a team player so far. What was it like treating her as a lead character? Did anything new about her reveal itself in the process of making the issue? Brian Michael Bendis: Any writer will tell you that there is no such thing as a supporting or team player. When you’re writing them, they are all lead characters. They are all stars, all A list. You the writer always know things about the character that the audience doesn’t know yet, and moving the spotlight over like this gives me the chance to show these things. What I was happy about was that people really seem to like her, and I felt I had not even shown the cool things that I like about her yet. Marvel.com: She was popular almost instantly. What do you think made the character click with audiences? Brian Michael Bendis: She has a Peter Parker quality to her—an every woman. She was just a normal girl living in the Gold Coast of Australia; we get a sense that she had not come even close to coming into her own. So it’s not hard for some of us to imagine ourselves in her situation—not unlike when Kitty Pryde first joined the X-Men. But I was really happy people liked her because I really liked her. Marvel.com: Something had to have happened to Eva while trapped in time to make her keep that secret from her teammates. Can you give us any clues as to what that incident might be? Brian Michael Bendis: Well, I don’t think it’s hard to imagine that it’s time travel related. She used her powers wrong and ended up somewhere or some when she should not have been. All of this is going to reveal itself inside the body of the Annual. The cool thing is you are going to see some Marvel characters that you have never seen in an X-Men comic before. Marvel.com: How will what Tempus went through while on her own affect her moving forward? Would you call this a definitive moment for her? Brian Michael Bendis: It is absolutely 100% a defining moment for her. And the fallout of this defining moment will define who she is in relation to the X-Men going forward—and it wasn’t where she or us thought she was going. Marvel.com: Andrea Sorrentino makes his Marvel debut with this issue. What made Andrea a perfect fit for this story? Brian Michael Bendis: I was so excited when [editor] Michael Marts told me Andrea was available. I have been in awe of his work on Green Arrow—as people who follow my Tumblr know I often display his work. I would look at the art and wonder how I could write for it. Mike Marts: Andrea is someone we’ve been dying to work with for some time. Fortunately his schedule opened up at the same time Brian was conceiving the idea for this awesome story featuring Eva Bell. It seemed like the perfect tale to capitalize on Andrea’s strengths as an artist, especially his talent of establishing expansive and panoramic settings—which this issue has plenty of! Brian Michael Bendis: The different settings and different visual fabric needed for this story gives Andrea all the opportunity to express himself in his unique way. I spent a lot of time thinking about how to make this the perfect vehicle for his very specific skills. What I love about him is that his design work makes it look like the comic page is almost too small for his ideas. I sincerely hope this is the beginning of a long creative collaboration. The first pages we got were so exciting that I immediately locked him down for his next gig. Marvel.com: A lot of great characters have been introduced during this run. Do you see Hijack, Goldballs, or Christopher Muse getting the spotlight treatment anytime soon? Brian Michael Bendis: Each of them has some very interesting and unique stories to tell and I hope that we can slow down a little bit and get to them as soon as possible. Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Princess Leia (Sun, 27 Jul 2014)
Princess Leia Following the epic 2015 launch of Marvel’s first new Star Wars ongoing series in decades in January and STAR WARS: DARTH VADER in February, March comes in like a royal lion with the five-issue limited series STAR WARS: PRINCESS LEIA. Written by writer Mark Waid and illustrated by artist Terry Dodson, the series promises a look at Leia like never before, focusing on the personal strength that saw her through her terrible trials after the destruction of her home planet Alderaan at the hands of the Galactic Empire. Marvel.com: Mark, was this an easy “yes” for you to take on a Star Wars series? How did it come about? Mark Waid: Editor Jordan D. White called and asked, and when the guy whose picture is on every can of Pringles calls, you pick up. Saying “yes” was a no-brainer—what an iconic character! Marvel.com: What about you, Terry? Why was there just no way that you’d turn down this book? Terry Dodson: I am a huge Star Wars fan, so the chance to work with the original characters was too good to pass up, plus being part of the re-launch of the comics at Marvel is great to be a part of. Star Wars and comics are intrinsically tied together for me. After watching “Star Wars: A New Hope” for the first time in theaters, I would buy everything I could Star Wars related—including the Marvel comics, which led me into buying other comics. And the first things I really remember trying to draw were Jawas and Tie Fighters. This is now the second time I've worked on Star Wars comics—I had the good fortune of working on the comics when the interest level in popular culture was high—the first time was the late 1990’s right when they were re-releasing the original films and I got to work on the actual characters just after “Return of the Jedi” in a story based off the popular Timothy Zahn novels, and now I will be working on the them with the new launch at Marvel and the new film coming out the same year! Marvel.com: Mark, what’s most compelling about Leia for you as a writer? Mark Waid: What makes her compelling to me is how multifaceted she is. Here’s a very strong, insanely capable woman who’s been to hell and back, who’s commanded armies and served with senators—and how old is she, again? Think about how much she’s experienced at such a young age and how much she’s lost. Marvel.com: Your story tackles the aftermath of Alderaan’s destruction for one; in what ways does this impact Leia the most? She seems to compartmentalize it in the first film; how will it manifest in your series? Mark Waid: She very much compartmentalizes it in “A New Hope,” but that's our springboard: how does she really cope with losing her entire world once the events around that loss have calmed down somewhat? Does she choose to be the princess of nothing—or does she set out to rebuild her heritage and her civilization? You can probably guess the answer. Marvel.com: Terry, what’s your take on Leia in a visual sense? Who is she and how will you show that on the page? Terry Dodson: Exactly who she is supposed to be. In this story it’s the Leia between “A New Hope” and “The Empire Strikes Back,” and the those two films are the peak of her significant role in the movies, so I’m just trying to capture that and really her growing in to that new role of rebel leader as opposed to just princess—fun stuff to do! Marvel.com: Leia has more costume changes than any other character in the original film trilogy; can we look forward to more of that in the limited series? Terry Dodson: Yep! There are plenty of opportunities and I love the challenge of designing new looks and incorporating the look of Star Wars into those designs; just really fun for me to do!  Marvel.com: Mark, which other characters from the existing films will show up and what kinds of roles will they play?  Mark Waid: Still early. The only thing I know for sure is that I don’t want to get overzealous with other characters—this is Leia’s story, after all. Marvel.com: What’s something we may get to see Leia do here that perhaps we’ve never seen before? Mark Waid: Negotiate from a position of absolute and total poverty. Marvel.com: And how’s it feel to have Terry by your side as artist? Mark Waid: It’s great reuniting with Terry again; I couldn't ask for a better partner in crime. He’s just the best when it comes to telling a story of wild imagination and human emotion all at the same time. Marvel.com: Terry, time to turn the table on Mark; what do you love most about working with him, especially on a series like this? Terry Dodson: I’ve been a big fan of his work for a long time and, you know, Mark is really on a roll right now writing in comics, with his work on DAREDEVIL and HULK plus his creator-owned work. Mark has a really great feel for what he wants to do with Leia in this specific time period and I think it lends itself to some really cool stuff for me to draw and explore more of the Star Wars universe and that time between the films. I think specific to the as-yet-unrevealed plot, it will work to Mark’s strength in writing character and dialogue! Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Darth Vader (Sun, 27 Jul 2014)
Darth Vader After the January 2015 launch of the first new Star Wars series at Marvel Comics in decades, writer Kieron Gillen and artist Salvador Larroca will delve into the Dark Side with STAR WARS: DARTH VADER, an ongoing series beginning in February. Darth Vader’s known as one of the greatest villains of all time, but in this series Gillen and Larroca explore not only the Dark Lord of the Sith’s action following the destruction of the first Death Star, but also the toll on the man behind the mask. Marvel.com: Kieron, how did you get involved with the series? What’s it like to be working with a character the caliber of Darth Vader?  Kieron Gillen: I picked up the phone and it was magnificent Marvel ukulele king Jordan D. White. He asked me if I’d be interested in writing a book set in the Star Wars universe. It wasn't even 100% going to be a Vader book at that point, but the possibility was immediately intoxicating. My worry was always fitting it to my schedule, so leaving IRON MAN ensured it could. Once in a life chance and all that, y’know? I’ve wanted to write a villain-centric book ever since I’ve become a comic writer. The idea that it was with one of the greatest villains of all time is overwhelming.  Marvel.com: Okay, then what’s your philosophy in writing a series that follows a fairly heinous villain? How do you engage the readers?   Kieron Gillen: Put it like this: who doesn’t love “The Godfather”?  My model for the series is “House of Cards.” A man in a position of power who is slighted and turns to tactics that he wouldn't have really considered before. In terms of engagement with the readers, it really helps that we're set in the period between “A New Hope” and “The Empire Strikes Back.” That’s an emotionally interesting place for Vader, and I suspect many people will empathize—if somewhat darkly—with his position.  Marvel.com: What will the coordination be like between this and Marvel’s other new Star Wars series?  Kieron Gillen: We’re doing two books that will reward people who choose to read them both, but also work entirely by themselves. The different perceptions will say a lot. To the [characters] in STAR WARS, Vader is this inescapable force who is almost beyond their comprehension. To Vader, chasing them is what he does on Tuesday, and he’s got a world of pain to deal with in the rest of the week.  Marvel.com: What else can you say about Vader at this point in the saga, just after “A New Hope”? Where’s his head and heart?  Kieron Gillen: Vader’s the sole survivor of the greatest military disaster in history—and a disaster that he definitely had a hand in by letting the rebels escape with the plans for the Death Star. This is not a thing which leaves you in anybody’s good books, let alone the Emperor’s. But along with that, there’s these nagging sensations. Why did Obi Wan return from hiding after all these years? What about that nagging sensation about that fighter pilot who was suspiciously strong in the Force? What else is going on?  The great thing about this period is what we don’t see on the screen. Vader learns who Luke Skywalker is at some point between the two movies, to choose but one example. There is a lot of genuine emotional meat on the bone.  Marvel.com: What will be his greatest personal challenge after the rebel’s victory? His boss? His subordinates? His enemies?  Kieron Gillen: Recovering his status. At the end of “A New Hope,” we see the aforementioned disaster. At the start of “Empire,” he's acting as if he’s more in control than he ever was in the first film. The journey between the two—what happened? That’s the challenge. And that challenge involves everything you listed, and a whole lot more. Marvel.com: What other existing Star Wars characters will be featured in the book?  Kieron Gillen: As many as I can grab and are useful, frankly. Once in a lifetime opportunity, remember. I’m not going to waste it. Apart from the rebels as antagonists, this is a book that walks on the—ahem—the dark side of the street. One of the things in “Empire” which always fascinated with me was how Vader clearly knows the bounty hunters. He knows Boba Fett well enough to say lay off on the disintegrations. He’s clearly something of a micromanager, but there’s a pre-existing relationship with that more seedy side of life. Any character from Star Wars who fits in that particular mix is very much on my list. Marvel.com: What about new characters and the roles they’ll play? Kieron Gillen: Making up a lot of new characters is necessary for the book; Vader is such an intimidating stoic that you need to give him a cast around him that plays other roles. This involves invention. The trick is making sure they clearly are grounded in the Star Wars universe’s mythos and looks. They have to feel Star Wars.  Also—some fun stuff with Rebels I suspect people won’t be expecting. And droids.  Marvel.com: How’s it feel to be working with Salvador on this one? Kieron Gillen: I'll let you into a secret: the best art is always from an artist who cares intensely about what they're drawing. The magical thing about doing Star Wars is that all the artists are utterly thrilled and inspired to be spending their time in this universe. Star Wars was a formative part of all our lives. The love is clear on the page. Marvel.com: On that note, let’s bring him into the conversation; Salvador, why did you say “yes” to this project? Salvador Larroca: Since I’m a big fan of the original three films, I’m delighted to be drawing these new stories between the films. I was 12 when I was first amazed by Star Wars and I can’t wait to draw my own take on these characters.  Marvel.com: How would you describe your take on Darth Vader himself, then? Salvador Larroca: Well, I’ll be staying close to the film design, of course. I think we must focus on keeping him recognizable and close to the image we all know and remember.  Marvel.com: Which characters are you looking forward to drawing the most? Salvador Larroca: I’m a big Han Solo fan, and of Chewbacca—even my dog has his name [Laughs]—but I’m absolutely pleased with drawing the rest of the characters. These films have a very specific look in terms of the visual design, and yes, I’ll try to fit into it all.  Marvel.com: How is Kieron the best writer in the galaxy for this book, in your opinion? Salvador Larroca: I’m sure that if he’s here on the series, it’s because he’s as big a fan as I am, and being as talented as he is I’m looking forward to seeing what he writes for me! I’m sure we’re going to be a great Star Wars team!  Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Star Wars (Sun, 27 Jul 2014)
Star Wars Star Wars triumphantly returns to Marvel Comics in January of 2015, spearheaded with a new ongoing series by writer Jason Aaron and artist John Cassaday. STAR WARS kicks off a brand-new tale that follows the events of “Star Wars: A New Hope” and features the entire original cast of characters who inhabit that galaxy far, far away. Aaron and Cassaday intend to bring their formidable storytelling abilities to bear on the saga, tapping into their own Star Wars fandom as well as their combined experience as consummate comic book professionals. Marvel.com: Jason, how did this project come about for you? What does it mean to you to be one of the creators who brings Star Wars back to Marvel?    Jason Aaron: It was offered and I instantly said yes. Of course I’m super-excited about all this. As a guy who can remember seeing the original Star Wars films in the theater on their first go-round, it was a big geek-out moment. Marvel.com: John, what about you? What does it mean for you personally to be working on this series?  John Cassaday: Marvel contacted me not long after the agreement with Lucasfilm was finalized. They knew I was quite a fan and guessed I’d be interested. They weren’t wrong! Star Wars means a lot to me. A couple of weeks later we had a dinner meeting so I could get the specifics. For every question, they had the perfect answer. They were gonna do this right. I easily checked off my list of concerns and agreed with a big smile. It was exciting.  Marvel.com: Jason, of all your past and current Marvel work, what do you feel will most inform your writing of STAR WARS?    Jason Aaron: This is clearly different than anything I’ve done for Marvel. And what most informs it is of course the films. I want this to feel very much like a direct sequel to the original Star Wars film; in terms of tone and voice and scope and everything.  Marvel.com: What sorts of themes do you see yourself exploring in the series? Is Star Wars about the characters or much larger things to you?    Jason Aaron: Every story is about the characters, and we’ll focus on all the old favorites. There will be big moments for everyone, from Han Solo to R2-D2. But a major part of the narrative will be driven by Luke Skywalker and his journey of discovery, a journey that will decide the fate of the entire galaxy.  Marvel.com: Okay, that said, who’s your favorite Star Wars character and why?    Jason Aaron: As a kid, it was Han Solo, like pretty much every other kid I knew. But right now, I’m enjoying writing them all. I never imagined how much fun it would be to write dialogue for C-3PO. And though it’s too soon to talk about it, yes, there will be new characters, too. Marvel.com: John, which of the main Star Wars characters most appeals to you visually and why? And what about the minor characters?  John Cassaday It’s always been Luke for me. I know Han tends to be a big fan favorite, but the “chosen one” archetypical hero is appealing to me. I also grew up on a farm in the middle of nowhere, so I’ve always had a basic connection with the longing that you see in Luke early on in the first film. I had it a bit easier, with only the one sun and all! In terms of minor characters, it’s still early in the process, so there really haven’t been any surprises yet, so we’ll see. Marvel.com: What’s it like working with the incredible design palette that was created for the films? Do you have any insights into what makes it all tick?  John Cassaday: It’s a headache and an absolute pleasure all at the same time. Getting the details together has been time consuming and tedious, but once I got going, it’s been great fun. It’s a huge gorgeous messy universe. I think with the first three films, in particular, the strange, almost junk-like approach to design was significant. They were piecing the ships and weapons together from real world items. Terrific old-school film making procedure; getting to work from a palette created by the likes of Ralph McQuarrie and Joe Johnston is an honor.  Marvel.com: What kind of new characters, beasts, and vehicles have you been working on for STAR WARS?  John Cassaday: Well, I can’t give away too much as of yet, but it’s a fun mix of what we’ve seen in the early films with a few fun surprises along the way. And then Spider-Man shows up. Ahem. Marvel.com: Jason, focusing on your story, what went into the decision to kick off it off immediately following the events of the first film?   Jason Aaron: Because we get all the main characters still together and still finding their roles within the Rebellion. And because there are so many major beats that happen off-screen between “A New Hope” and “The Empire Strikes Back,” I’ll be looking to explore all of those beats.  Marvel.com: What is your favorite thing that you’ve written in issue #1 and why?    Jason Aaron: I couldn’t pick just one. The arrival of Han Solo. R2-D2 sound effects. Chewbacca in action. Vader under attack. The first time a lightsaber hums to life.    Marvel.com: And what does John excel at in the universe of Star Wars?    Jason Aaron: John is the world’s biggest Star Wars fan and it shows on every page of this. He’s pouring his heart into these pages, and he’s so completely devoted to making them look and feel like the movies he loved as a kid. Marvel.com: John, your turn; what’s it like working with Jason so far on the series? John Cassaday: Though I knew his name, I wasn’t very familiar with Jason’s work. Marvel sent me over some trades to read and it was clear how talented he was. We spent some time on the west coast back in March discussing storyline possibilities, so I had a good idea as to where things were going and it was very promising. But when I finally got the first script I was thrilled. He not only hit strong story beats and made it fun, but he captured these characters that I’ve known most of my life. I could hear them delivering the dialog. It was as if he had Lucas and Lawrence Kasdan over his shoulder as he wrote. Hell, I could also hear the music! Marvel.com: Okay, Jason; let’s bring it on home: If you had your druthers, what one element from Marvel’s past Star Wars stories would you bring back?    Jason Aaron: The giant bunny rabbit, of course. Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more! Star Wars
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SDCC 2014: Avengers NOW! (Sat, 26 Jul 2014)
Avengers NOW! The face of the Marvel Universe will change, all starting with the triumvirate of Avengers who represent the Mt. Rushmore of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes. This fall, Steve Rogers and Thor Odinson will make way for Sam Wilson and an enigmatic female champion to assume their respective mantles, while Tony Stark’s grand vision for a superior tomorrow constitutes just as sweeping a firmware update for the man in the iron mask. Marvel Comics’ Executive Editor Tom Brevoort and Editor in Chief Axel Alonso speak to the new status quo, and the story behind the changes. First, nobody’s dying. “Neither Steve Rogers nor the artist formerly known as Thor are going to be vanishing from the pages of our titles any time soon,” reports Brevoort. “Their stories are not over and they’ll have a role to play in what comes next. It’s just a different role than anything we’ve seen them doing before—which is interesting and exciting!” So, where did these changes originate, and why are they all happening at once? The editors insist that it’s more a case of serendipity than agenda, though it shouldn’t come as a surprise that such radical changes rose up independently. The Marvel NOW! epoch has been epitomized by experimentation and bold gambits, all in service of great storytelling. “First and foremost,” says Alonso, “This is about telling good stories. These transformations did not come about due to an editorial edict; they came about because the writer of each series thought it would make for cool stories. Rick Remender has some very cool stories to tell with a red-white-and-blue-clad Sam Wilson. Jason Aaron had some very cool stories to tell with a female Thor wielding the hammer. Ditto for Tom Taylor, with his ‘superior’ Iron Man. “These plans have been underway for many months, and each of them came about independently. ALL-NEW CAPTAIN AMERICA came out of events in the core series, THOR was birthed by events in Original Sin, and the SUPERIOR IRON-MAN came about because of the upcoming AXIS. They were all pitched by the writers, and the strength of each pitch got us past any trepidation we might have had about doing any of them.” Given that this changing of the guard arrives at the crest of Rick Remender’s AXIS event, big changes will not be limited to the heroic roster. Marvel’s most sinister villains watch on with interest. “I think this all depends on the villain,” says Brevoort of the bad guys’ plans. “Some may see this as the perfect moment to strike, while there seems to be some weakness or lack of experience on the part of the heroes who’ve taken on those roles—it will be up to the new Cap and the new Thor to convince those villains of the errors of their ways. And the Marvel underworld is constantly changing and evolving, far faster than the world of the heroes, actually, so I wouldn’t expect that to slow down any time in the near future.” With the announcements of a new Captain America and new female Thor creating conversation in the mainstream press, the Marvel offices continue to receive copious feedback. While change can be intimidating, the editors take heart in a groundswell of excitement and debate. “Whenever we announce a change this big—let alone three changes this big—we anticipate that the first round of feedback will be negative,” says Alonso. “But in this case, it’s been more positive than negative, which perhaps says something about the audience’s willingness to be challenged. I sure don’t hope anyone takes solace in the assumption that any of these changes are temporary, because the storytelling opportunities they present are limitless.” Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Scarlet Spiders (Sat, 26 Jul 2014)
Scarlet Spiders Late this fall, the fate of all the Spider characters may well rest with three clones. In the SCARLET SPIDERS limited series from writer Mike Costa and artist Paco Diaz, Kaine, the Ultimate Universe’s Jessica Drew, and an alternate Ben Reilly undertake a quest to save reality that very well may end up costing them their lives even if they do complete it. Just imagine what could happen if they do not succeed… “Obviously I can’t give too much away just yet, but the group in SCARLET SPIDERS plays a very important role in stopping Morlun,” teases editor Devin Lewis in reference to the primary villain of the Spider-Verse event. “Without this group of three and their mission, there’s a decent chance that the Spider-Men from across the multiverse won’t even survive Morlun’s assault.” Lewis stands convinced that Marvel has recruited the perfect team to bring this series to life in Costa and Diaz. “From the get-go, we wanted this limited series to have a unique feel, as the characters we’re dealing with all have very specific worldviews,” he recalls. “Mike has shown in the past that he has a skill at deftly blending tension and suspense with action and adventure and we knew we wanted to play with those elements in this series. From the outset, Spider-Verse is a high-stakes, fast paced story, and focusing in on characters and their motivations in that kind of environment is Mike’s specialty. “I had the opportunity to work with Paco on SUPERIOR SPIDER-MAN TEAM-UP, and he’s got such a terrific style that we knew he’d be a great fit for this book. Paco’s a triple threat in that he has a great storytelling sense, knows how stage a great action scene, and can draw pretty much anything! We wanted someone who could make those notes sing on the page.” Diaz, for his part, has already begun to rise to the challenge. “I'm digitally inking my work and the results are beginning to look very good on the page,” explains the artist. “However, I think one of my peculiarities is never to be satisfied with my job, with my art, and therefore I try to improve every day. “Digital is an exciting new technique that allows me to show my skills in a new way. I can foresee a pretty cool future for this book.” One distinct challenge of the story comes from its ensemble nature. All three characters come from different universes; they boast three distinctly different personalities, even if they’re all clones of Peter Parker. “Luckily, we have a terrific character writer in Mike, and he’s going to be able to interweave the big action set pieces that are in store for our heroes with more intimate character arcs that are the glue for a story like this,” contends Lewis. “From our very first phone call, it was obvious that Mike sees this as an opportunity to show the different sides of these characters, and the easiest way to do that is to play to all of their strengths. “Kaine really serves as the entry point for readers to this group. He’s a mainstay in the Marvel Universe, now, so that gives him a unique perspective on the events of Spider-Verse as they unfold. “The Ben Reilly in this story is from a universe where Peter Parker never returned from his time in Oregon during the Clone Saga. When we were having our first conversations on the phone, Mike was intent on working out who this guy is. How does he think? What’s his outlook and how is it different from the Peter Parker we all know and love? “Ultimate Jessica Drew has already had a pretty rough go of it herself, and one of the things Mike and I discussed and were intent on bringing to the fore was her sense of identity, especially now that she has seen there’s a multiverse rife with Spider-People. She’s already had a difficult journey after ULTIMATUM, the death of her world’s Spider-Man, and the invasion of Galactus, and things aren’t about to get easier.” For the artist, the characters also represent certain obstacles, especially the similarly built Kaine and Ben Reilly. “I'm trying to improve my work, above all, with the characters’ expressiveness,” says Diaz. “When they wear masks you need to implement several different resources: repeating some motifs, developing specific body language for each and so on. It is a complicated job, but, of course, it's an awesome challenge. I hope all the work be reflected in the final result.” In developing each Scarlet Spider for the page, he admits he certainly has a preferred character. “My favorite character here in this limited series is definitely Jessica Drew,” he confesses. “I love to draw the female figure and I think she is a great counterpart in this party of three.” All in all, the team makes sure that these Spiders get the respect they deserve and the Clone does not get treated as some kind of four-letter word. “This is a team with a definite purpose, and some of them might not make it out alive,” Lewis forebodingly promises. “What could that mean? You’ll just have to wait and see!” Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Captain America & The Mighty Avengers (Sat, 26 Jul 2014)
Captain America & The Mighty Avengers “It is fantastic that there's more diverse representation going on on the page,” says writer Al Ewing, “And I'm hoping that this is only the start.” One of Marvel’s richest, most diverse ensembles gets even more interesting as Sam Wilson joins Luke Cage, Spider-Man, White Tiger, Monica Rambeau, Blade and the rest for a bold new chapter. It all starts with CAPTAIN AMERICA & THE MIGHTY AVENGERS #1 by Ewing and artist Luke Ross. Though the former Falcon provided air support for the team in the past, his new role as Captain America means a shifted paradigm for the rag-tag roster that began as Manhattan’s only line of defense against Thanos. “Well, it does look a lot like Sam is taking the lead,” says Ewing of the title change and new status quo. “But Mighty Avengers has always been a co-led operation, with Luke running the organizational side and Monica leading in the field. So if there's any tension building—and there will be—it’ll be going three ways. On the bright side, by the time it’s all over, the Mighty Avengers will have one, definitive leader; although on the less bright side, one of the team will have left the building.” Aside from the chain of command, the team must contend with a few more personal matters, like dealing with Spider-Man’s earlier attempts to sic Child Services on Luke and Jessica, meddling with their custody of daughter Danielle. Sometimes it seems like Peter will never be clear of the headaches Doc Ock left for him in his tenure as Superior Spider-Man. “Well, Otto did leave a lot of mess,” laughs Ewing. “Pete’s dealing with most of that in his own book, but Otto was so incredibly objectionable during his short time as a Mighty Avenger that it's only natural Pete would want to come back and apologize. The question is will the apology be accepted? Or is Pete going to have to work a lot harder to get back in Luke and Jess’s good books?” As for the external threats, those baddies the team hopes to thwart once they get their own house in order? The Marvel underworld rarely looked so poised to take advantage of a heroic front so occupied with a game of musical chairs. “Well, I don't want to spoil any of the details of AXIS that have remained unspoiled so far,” the writer says, “But I will say that AXIS does ring a couple of changes. That departing member I mentioned is going to be out the door as a direct result of the AXIS-related events. AXIS provides some early threats as well, which, again, I won't spoil—though I will mention that CORTEX Incorporated is waiting in the wings, ready to swoop in and acquire the Mighty Avengers by fair means or foul.” Whatever the threat and however high the odds might be stacked, the Avengers team so rooted in the ethos of the Heroes for Hire remains dedicated to protect the helpless and exact swift justice on those who prey upon the weak. “As for the mission statement, same as it's ever been,” promises Ewing. “Help those in need, however they need it. This is where all the work over the previous series pays off; the Gem is refurbished and ready, the hotline is in place, the field team is on standby to take care of the problems nobody else can handle. The Mighty Avengers are hitting the ground running.” Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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SDCC 2014: Angela: Asgard's Assassin (Sat, 26 Jul 2014)
Angela: Asgard's Assassin Spinning out of the events of Original Sin, Angela, an angel from the tenth realm has learned her true heritage as an Asgardian daughter of Odin. And she’s not exactly happy about it! We had the chance to talk with writers Marguerite Bennett and Kieron Gillen and artist Stephanie Hans—who will also be joined by Phil Jimenez—to find out just what they have in store for Marvel’s angriest angel. Marvel.com: Angela is still a relatively new character to the Marvel Universe so do you want to give her a brief introduction so people that may not already be familiar know who we’re talking about? Kieron Gillen: Yeah, we probably could. Angela is a character who has relatively few stories published but has an incredibly complicated history. [Laughs] Conceptually is probably the better way to talk about her, especially as you get into specifics. The sort of line we use to describe her is “Asgardian Black Widow,” in terms of how she acts, how she fights, how she moves, even the fact that she’s somebody with a lot of red in her ledger. And specifically she’s obsessed with the concept of what she owes people and what people owe her. So that’s kind of at the core of it. It’s recently known that she’s Thor’s sister, who was lost during an ancient war between the Angels, who are the people who raised her, and Asgard, who are the people who the Asgardians come from. And now that Angela’s being revealed to be the daughter of Odin and she’s been ostracized by her own people, the Angels, who completely despise the Asgardians and she also still hates the Asgardians so she’s kind of like a girl without a home. There’s a lot Ronin to her, a lot of Lone Cowboy when we meet her. Would that explain it, Marguerite? Marguerite Bennett: I think so. She’s just terribly tied to her ideology, it almost supersedes her personality in a lot of ways, traditionally. And so now she’s gotten to the point where that ideology can no longer stand up under scrutiny with the revelation of her past and her birthright and so now she’s going to have to negotiate how on Earth she can bring these two separate identities to term and move forward with this really cool understanding of what she was meant to be compared to what she became. Kieron Gillen: And she fights things. Marguerite Bennett: And she fights things. And she has a sassy friend. Kieron Gillen: She has a sassy friend who’s an important element to the story. Marguerite clearly has the same problem that I do, in that I do the deep character reading all very serious and then go, “Oh yeah, there’s action too.” [Laughs] Marguerite Bennett: And there’s hitting! Marvel.com: So the title of the book is ANGELA: ASGARD’S ASSASSIN. You just said that she hates all Asgardians so is she assassinating them or working for them in some capacity where she still manages to hate them? Kieron Gillen: The mutability or various meanings of the actual title is certainly part of the book’s concept, is my best way of putting it. Her status quo is open when we join her and, as I mentioned the fact of Black Widow earlier, her background was as an assassin but she really isn’t one anymore. In that kind of spy thing. So her working out how to relate that concept, how she’s an Asgardian, because she is an Asgardian despite everything she might think and what she thinks of herself as a hunter. That’s what the Angels taught her. Really, when you see she’s hunting humans as well as monsters, there’s another word for that, you know? Marvel.com: Angela is a unique character in that she came over to Marvel from another company. Stephanie, how are you handling working on a character with such a different design aesthetic? Stephanie Hans: I really doesn’t make any difference for me; it’s all in the attitude. It’s always the same for me, each time I get to work on a new character; I’m trying to let the reader see the person behind the costume. That's what I'm working on. Designs, colors, I don’t care; it’s only material. It’s the background that I look at first and that's what I try to bring to the readers. Marvel.com: The book has both two writers and two artists, how are you on the art side juggling such a large creative team? Stephanie Hans: You know we all live in different countries anyway. In a way it makes things easier, at least for me. I really want to focus on my part of the book, which is to give the right painting to the script. Being one page or one hundred, you always do it one at a time. The more you think about the importance of a project, the more you feel the pressure when in the end for me it's always the same job: bringing a story to life and giving it flesh. From my point of view, I only have five pages to paint each month. Marvel.com: We don’t know much about the plot.  Are there any details you can hint at as to what’s actually going to be happening in the book or is that still hush-hush? Kieron Gillen: We’re kind of keeping it quite tight. So the format of the story is Angela is basically on the run for reasons that become immediately apparent and she is trying to achieve something while she’s on the run. So it gives her a chance to interact with a lot of different people so by the end of the first arc we really get a sense of who Angela is vis–à–vis the Marvel Universe. This is how she interacts with Asgardians, this is how she interacts with Angels. This is how she interacts with the Guardians and the cosmic stuff. Here is how she interacts with the Earth. You get a sense of who she is and where she fits into the larger picture. There’s quite a bit of “Lone Wolf and Cub” in the first arc, with a pretty hard twist on it to be honest. But that’s a lot of the imagery that I had of her is this kind of solitary, really scary and tough. So that’s kind of what the first arc feels like. I think we kind of what to keep it under wraps what actually happens. Marguerite Bennett: Loose lips sink giant floating Asgardian space cities. Marvel.com: Always a good idea to keep the readers guessing and waiting and wanting more! Kieron Gillen: I’ll give you a couple of clues. It kind of spins off some stuff I did in Asgard before. If people liked my JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY or Matt Fraction’s Thor, the kind of stuff we did together, there’s a level of elements that build from what happened in Original Sin. At the same time, it’s very much its own story. It’s kind of what I do in terms of plotting-wise. A little bit more meat on the bone. Marvel.com: Without knowing much of the plot there any other characters, new or established, that you’re excited to get to draw? Stephanie Hans: I really hope I will get to draw the new Loki. I’m sure I can make him sexy. Marvel.com: What’s the actual collaboration process on the writing side of things before it even gets to the art. Kieron Gillen: We’re still sort of finding our way, aren’t we, Marguerite? Marguerite Bennett: We felt that within each story we’re going to have a story that’s told by Sara, who is a new companion of Angela’s and who has known her for a very, very long time but has been lost. And so when Sara is reintroduced she brings in a knowledge of Angela and begins to tell these stories that are interwoven into the plot. They’re not backups, they are authentic and organic to the story as it functions and she spins out these legends and cautionary tales and dire warnings of the idea of who Angela was and how she’s known and the great myths that have sprung out of her wake. And then those myths are highlighted or destroyed by the actual actions that you’ll see Angela taken throughout the story and so just the idea of who she was supposed to be, who she was heralded to be, and who she is now and who she intends to become. Kieron Gillen: We kind of really lean into that artistically because Phil is doing the main story for us and Stephanie the myth/stories. So the fact that there’s such a difference between the art styles is something we’re trying to use as a technique. They’re both wonderful artists. The other thing is the higher level planning stuff we’re doing together, essentially. The execution is that I’ll be handling the main block of the story arc, at least for this first arc, and Marguerite is concentrating on other things. But we haven’t finished the first arc. We might change our minds halfway through and switch for an issue or something. Any co-writing thing is always, you make up as you go along and see what’s working. Marvel.com: Artists are also story-tellers in your own right. Stephanie, are you contributing in any way to Angela’s story? Stephanie Hans: I think that's the interaction between the script and the drawings that makes a full comic book. The feeling of the stories would of course be totally different with any other artist and I think it already tells a lot about what you can expect from the book. I often compare the relationship between the drawing and the scenarios to the one between the colors and the line-art. The rule for a colorist is “the line always comes first.” The colors should never erase the line. That's the same for me. The scenario always comes first and my role is to make it shine. Of course knowing my work, you should certainly expect power and dignity because that's the way I love to draw women and that's certainly my main contribution to the storytelling and I'm pretty sure that's what's expected from me. Marvel.com: And how do you feel that your artistic style works with Phil Jimenez’s? Stephanie Hans: Phil has a strong and solid style, very neat when compared to mine which is perfect to tell the main story. I have a more ethereal rendering which should fit the tone of the smaller stories. Marvel.com: Is this your first time co-writing a book like this? Kieron Gillen: Oh no, I’ve done, maybe not ongoing, but I’ve done “Everything Burns” with Matt. I was co-writing with Fraction on my first UNCANNY X-MEN arc. I’ve just come off the back of the Original Sin thing I did with Mark Waid and there might be another one in there somewhere but I forgot it. Oh yeah, the “Exiled” [crossover] I did with [Dan] Abnett and [Andy] Lanning. So the weird thing is that it’s just different every time and you actually have to work at how it will work for you. When I was doing it with Fraction it was like we were sitting with a shared Google Doc and we were plotting it together, which was very funny because you just see us deleting each other’s work. Marguerite Bennett: [Laughs] Oh no! Kieron Gillen: It’s just like, “Nope! Not doing that, Matt!” “Yes, you are!” “No, we’re not!” You really do make it up as you go along. It’s never 50/50. The total amount of effort adds up to more than 100%, which is the most depressing thing. [Laughs] Marvel.com: The way you keep talking about Angela makes her sound like she’s Punisher with a big sword and wings. Kieron Gillen: She’s not as sure about stuff. When she chooses the fight, she’s pragmatic and has very little joy in it anymore. She used to have joy in it and that’s one of the things with the character we’re trying to reconnect, why the hell am I doing this anyway? Yes, I’m the best in the universe, what does that matter? Marguerite Bennett: The Punisher comes from a place of self-righteous anger where with Angela it’s balancing the scales, its people getting what they deserve. There’s no room for pettiness or revenge in her but there’s also no room for mercy, necessarily. Kieron Gillen: It’s one of the scary things about Angela is she’ll make sure the debt is repaid whether we like it or not. Marguerite Bennett: Stannis Baratheon [from “Game of Thrones”] comes to mind. Kieron Gillen: She doesn’t always like living by this code and that’s the problem with having a code and there’s some of the most interesting parts of the character. I referenced the Punisher occasionally in my pitch document in terms of how she acts and other people definitely view her like the Punisher in terms of, she walks in the room and people worry as in, “Why is she in the room and how the hell can I leave the room?” But when you get to know, she’s got sort of a sidekick, that’s one way of phrasing it. Sara, who’s an Angel and one of Angela’s only friends and there’s kind of a dark history between them and she’s kind of, it’s not quite the same, but she’s kind of Gabrielle to Xena, is an easy way of explaining it. So you get to see different bits of her through it but no, there is something cold and threatening about Angela but there’s enough of other things to make it not just “Scary Blank Lady” book. There’s got be a reason or it’s just this grim woman who kills people. [Laughs] There must be another reason for people to read the book or that would be tedious. Marvel: We’ve been increasing the number of books with female leads. Is it exciting to be part of a trend to increase character diversity in comics? Stephanie Hans: What do you think? [Laughs] As a woman, of course I am always happy to see the comic book industry trusting their readers to be interested in female lead stories. What’s even more interesting is when these characters are not that easy to love at first sight—at least not in a very “womanly” way. What’s important there is that first of all, it’s a good story. And that’s all that should matter. Kieron Gillen: Yeah. It certainly is for me. I try to keep my cast at least 50/50 even when I have a male lead and my UNCANNY X-MEN team was explicitly half men/half women and one robot, now that I think about it. And GENERATION HOPE, Hope was the lead, but it’s the first time I’ve ever done a solo lead female character. So that’s very appealing, that certainly attracted me to the book. Marguerite Bennett: Oh, I’m completely stoked. I don’t really have anything eloquent to put in at that point; it’s just going to be lots of fangirl cheering at that point. Kieron Gillen: She’s a new character to the Marvel Universe so finding a way to really integrate her into the universe—there’s no point in having a super hero character that does the job of another character in the universe. The worst they can be is a copy. You can’t have a character do Iron Man’s job because that’s Iron Man’s. You can’t have a character be the smartest man in the room because that’s Reed Richard’s job. That’s when you’ve got set universes, you need to work out a place where they can be powerful, interesting, and new. With Angela, that’s what our job is, to make this very distinctive character and that’s a very interesting way to make it work, I think. I may be rambling. Marvel.com: So uncharacteristic for you, Kieron. Will this be a good book for people who haven’t really read much Angela before? Marguerite Bennett: Yes, it’ll be very accessible. Kieron Gillen: Yeah. It’s ANGELA #1. If you can’t start reading ANGELA #1, you’re in trouble. While it builds on some stuff that came before, this is as fresh and a new start for any character I’ve ever tried to write. Marguerite Bennett: The secondary stories are definitely going to help integrate any kind of backstory or any necessary information so we’re going to make it as fun a process as possible for new fans. Marvel.com: Anything else readers should know to get excited about the book? Stephanie Hans: It’s a good story, I mean it. Marguerite Bennett: The only thing that I will add is the most intimidating thing about this project is coming up with something worthy to have Stephanie draw it. More so than any fan pressure, that is the number one thing I’m worried about. Kieron Gillen: Say what you like, this book will beautiful. [Laughs] You don’t need to care about the writers. The art alone will make this look incredibly classy so I just have to live up to it. Who cares about the writers? Marguerite Bennett: We’re professional liars. Kieron Gillen: I’m a fairly unprofessional liar. Marguerite Bennett: You’re a professional fan fic writer, that’s what all my business cards will say. Marvel.com: I don’t know if Angela, with her moral code, will take too kindly to professional liars. Marguerite Bennett: Watch out, I might not be the co-writer for very long! Can’t make it to the convention? Follow along with our live coverage at marvel.com/sdcc2014 plus keep up on our social channels for the latest news, exclusive videos, real-time announcements, image galleries, up to date schedules and more!
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Follow the History of Deadpool Pt. 3 (Wed, 29 May 2013)
The History of Deadpool Pt. 3 By Brett White After making a bloody splash as an X-Force villain just over 20 years ago, Deadpool has grown from a cult favorite second banana to Marvel's most notorious leading mercenary. On June 25, 2013, comic book fans everywhere will get to experience life in the red and black tights when Deadpool's first ever video game breaks its way into stores. This marks Wade Wilson's first time headlining a game after appearing in other titles like “Marvel: Ultimate Alliance” and the Marvel vs. Capcom series. To celebrate this momentous occasion, we're giving you an in-depth look at Deadpool's history, from his humble beginnings as X-Force's snarkiest foe all the way to today. Be sure to visit the Marvel Digital Comics Shop and Marvel Digital comics Unlimited to brush up on your 'Pool history! What's a merc to do when the object of his affection needs breaking out of a mental institution? In X-FORCE #47, Deadpool answered Siryn's call for help after a failed mission landed her in the Weisman Institute for the Criminally Insane. But just as Wade busted X-Force's field leader out, he got left behind with all memory of his involvement removed from Siryn's mind by the manipulative Gamesmaster. When her memories returned in X-FORCE #56, Theresa went back to rescue Deadpool. With both halves of this odd couple finally free, 'Pool paid his rescuer back with a kiss which…didn't really please her. Better luck next time? 1997's DEADPOOL #1—kicking off DP’s first ongoing series—shoved a lot of Wilson's skeletons out of their cozy closet. The issue gave readers an unobstructed look at Deadpool's home life in a quaint San Francisco home with his elderly live-in prisoner, the cantankerous and feisty Blind Al. Wade took a mission to destroy a science outpost in Antarctica. Not a problem—until Deadpool discovered that Dr. Walter Langkowski—better known as Alpha Flight's Sasquatch—ran the outpost. The ensuing fight—because of course there was a fight—damaged the outpost's gamma core and threatened to irradiate half of Earth. Wade did the unthinkable to prevent a global catastrophe: he dove into the gamma core to fix it, saving the day and exhausting his healing factor. The intergalactic holding company Landau, Luckman and Lake claimed responsibility for DP's Antarctic mission, claiming they set him up to find out if he could be the hero their in-house prophets had said he would be. Wilson laughed off their offer to become a working good guy. With his healing factor broken, Deadpool tracked down Dr. Killebrew with Siryn's help. The former Weapon X geneticist wished to atone for the unspeakable horrors he did to Wade, so the doctor cured the merc's gamma irradiated healing factor with a healthy dose of Hulk-blood procured via impalement in DEADPOOL #4. This freed Wilson up to murder Killebrew, but Siryn convinced him otherwise, thus setting Deadpool on the heroic path that LL&L saw in his future. The path to true heroism included a few nasty pit stops. Getting involved in a bloody relationship with the deranged Typhoid Mary didn't help in DAREDEVIL/DEADPOOL ANNUAL. Temporarily posing as Spider-Man in the hero's early days and scaring Aunt May nearly to death didn't show great care for the time stream in DEADPOOL #11. Throwing Weasel and Blind Al in a dark room filled with knives, buzzsaws and razor blades just because the two communicated behind his back did demonstrate much heroism, and rushing headfirst into a battle with the psychopath T-Ray nearly got ‘Pool killed in DEADPOOL #14. All of those setbacks proved necessary to push Deadpool towards accepting LL&L's offer when agent Zoe Culloden pulled his broken body out of the snow. In DEADPOOL #17, the Merc with a Mouth learned his destiny as the Mithras with a mouth, a being charged with shepherding in the messiah. After coming to terms with his fate, Wilson prepared himself for his job, which turned out to just involve gutting an alien messiah-killer named Tiamat. The prediction became less than clear, though, as the messiah Deadpool pledged to protect turned out to be a celestial entity that robbed civilizations of their free will. After learning the truth in DEADPOOL #25, Wade turned against his mission and killed both his adversaries and the being he had been meant to safeguard. The world lost a "messiah" and gained continued free will. With his destiny destroyed and his entire support group gone, Wade fled San Francisco permanently. As far as he ran, though, his past came back in the physical form of ex-wife, Mercedes. Although he didn't initially remember being married, Deadpool’s memories of their life together and tragic end came back slowly. Mercedes had been murdered by T-Ray after the naive Wilsons took him in, an act that threatened to be repeated after T-Ray showed up again on DP's doorstep. DEADPOOL #33 dropped a bomb on the merc's backstory, as T-Ray revealed Mercedes to actually be his wife, Wade Wilson his true name, and the man who ruined their lives—Deadpool. T-Ray's magic left Wilson on the brink of death, and the reunited Wilson couple left Wade to rot and recuperate in hell. But does this revelation shake Deadpool's core sense of self? Not one bit! After all, no one should trust a psychopath with a band-aid for a nose like T-Ray! Check out DEADPOOL (1997) in the Marvel Digital Comics Shop, plus on Marvel Unlimited.
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Download 'This Week in Marvel' Episode 81.5 (Tue, 28 May 2013)
Download 'This Week in Marvel' Episode 81.5 Download episode #81.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com Ryan and Ben welcome their old pal "The Fallen Angel" Christopher Daniels, Impact Wrestling star and one half of the tag team Bad Influence, to the show. Enjoy a free-flowing discussion of comics and wrestling, including Daniels' plans for Slammiversary, his thoughts on Marvel NOW! and much more! Download episode #81.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Centralgrab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes or Zune, so you never miss an episode! This Week in Marvel will focus on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases--from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Tuesday and Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel Digital Media Group Executive Editorial Director Ryan "Agent M" Penagos and Marvel.com Editor Ben Morse with Associate Producer Blake Garris and Associate Editor Marc Strom.  We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes! Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM@BenJMorse or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel! And if your message is longer than 140 characters, send it through fans.marvel.com!
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